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WHS Softball Senior Profile Aliyah Tang

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first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — This is the final installment in a series of profiles celebrating the five recent WHS graduates who played on this year’s varsity softball team.Aliyah TangAliyah began playing softball the summer going into 9th grade. Aliyah had always been athletic and was able to pick up a new sport that she was interested in very quickly. Growing up, Aliyah was always fast and her speed came in handy with her new found love for the game of softball. Growing up, she took part in many different sports. She cheered, played basketball, volleyball, and even ran track/xc. All of her close friends played softball and encouraged her to play with them on the Lowell Mojo team during the summer just for fun. Luckily, she found her sport and kept at it for the next four years.A few months after high school started, Aliyah found out Mojo was discontinuing its program. She found a place on the New England Nor’easters with coach Timothy Kieran. She needed a lot of work, but Tim saw a lot of potential in her and helped shape her to be the player she is today. Aliyah was welcomed with open arms by teammates she will never forget; Ryan Bailey and Gianna Brunetto. She found her new softball family.Aliyah started off as a third basemen with Mojo because of her strong arm, then Tim saw her potential as an outfielder. She was quick and tracked balls easily. The summer after freshman year ended, she had a great season with NE and continued to play fall ball with Tim. She met her new teammates Antonia Kieran who she is now best friends with and Adele Burton. Most importantly, she met her close friend Ally Moran. She would soon end her softball career in 2018 catching for Ally, building a strong friendship.In October 2015, Aliyah’s family moved to Wilmington and she enrolled into WHS. Aliyah was now with all of her Nor’easter teammates and she felt at home. Sophomore year, she took part in Wilmington High’s softball program as an outfielder and slap hitter. Going into 11th grade she played for the Northeast Xtreme and found her calling as a catcher. Although her family wishes she caught sooner in her career, they’re glad she ended her amazing senior season catching for the Wildcats.Aliyah will be attending Auburn University and majoring in Mechanical Engineering. Her family is extremely proud of her accomplishments.Aliyah Tang(NOTE: The above profile is from Wilmington Little League.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWHS SOFTBALL: Wildcats Defeat Winchester (9-3) & Arlington (5-2) To Improve To 7-2In “Sports”WHS Softball Senior Profile: Adele BurtonIn “Sports”WHS SOFTBALL: Wildcats Wrap Up Regular Season With 10-0 WinIn “Sports”last_img read more

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Two New Zealand scientists to travel to Antarctica to measure magnetic South

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first_img(PhysOrg.com) — While the rest of the world gets on with meeting the New Year head on, two research scientists from New Zealand are traveling to the Antarctic to take measurements of the magnet South Pole. Such periodic measurements are necessary geo-scientists say, because the magnetic poles keep moving around. The south magnetic pole, for example is slowly moving north toward Australia at almost ten miles per year; this matters because very accurate ground measurements are necessary to keep satellites properly calibrated, ensuring such things as GPS coordinates are accurate. The magnetic poles move, as do other parts of the Earth’s surface, because the outer core inside the planet is made of molten metal. As the Earth moves through space, spinning and circling the sun, there is some jostling that goes on, resulting in some shifting. And unfortunately, it doesn’t do so in a regular predictable fashion, which means changes to the surface of the Earth must be constantly monitored all over the planet. For reasons that aren’t exactly clear, New Zealand has been charged with monitoring the south magnetic pole, and has been doing so by traveling there every five years since the 1950’s.This latest expedition, made up of just two guys, Stewart Bennie and Tony Hurst, will travel first to a particularly barren locale known as Lake Vanda in one of Antarctica’s dry valley areas. After that, they will travel to a site near the shelter constructed and used by the infamous polar explorer Robert Scott and his team before they were lost trying to return home back in 1912-13 as part of the Terra-Nova Expedition.To take their measurements, the team will make note of physical landscape features, then will use a tool known as a magnetic theodolite to measure magnetic field angles relative to the ground. At the south magnetic pole, such fields should be 90 degrees relative to the horizon. They will also be using instruments that allow them to measure the strength of the magnetic field, which will be useful, because scientists have found that the magnetic fields have been diminishing over the past couple of hundred years, a sign perhaps that a “flip” is in the making over the next thousand years or so.To take into account the wobbling that occurs with magnetic fields, the two will take many such measurements over the course of a day to make sure that what they bring back to report, is truly accurate. © 2011 PhysOrg.com Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. South Pole… 1: South Geographic Pole, 2: South Magnetic Pole (2007), 3: South Geomagnetic Pole, 4: South Pole of Inaccessibility. Image: Wikipediacenter_img via Nature Ulysses Flyby of the Sun’s North Pole Citation: Two New Zealand scientists to travel to Antarctica to measure magnetic South Pole (2012, January 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-01-zealand-scientists-antarctica-magnetic-south.html More information:last_img read more

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