Members discuss voting, relief fund, pep rallies

first_imgStudent senate covered a broad agenda during titsmeeting Wednesday and discussed plans for voter registration and education, a disaster relief fund and the upcoming Stanford pep rally in Purcell Pavilion. Social Concerns chair Pat McCormick said efforts for voter registration and education kicked off Monday with a standing-room-only crowd for the lecture “Pizza, Pop and Politics: Midterm Elections 2010.” “The way that we have developed [voter registration] in terms of an action plan splits into three tiers,” McCormick said. “We have spent a lot of time researching this because it is really a priority.” The plan includes education on election issues for all voters, voter registration for residents of Indiana and encouraging out-of-state students to participate in midterm elections in the best way possible, McCormick said. Those students who are not residents of Indiana may legally switch their residency to Indiana and vote in local elections, but this change could be problematic when transitioning back to their home state, McCormick said. “State laws vary in terms of switching your permanent residency,” McCormick said. “We are encouraging everyone who is thinking about switching their residency to Indiana to register here to meet with someone who can give them legal specifics.” Oversight chair Paige Becker said her committee is planning a disaster relief fund that would help the University reach out financially after a crisis. “The fund would act somewhat like a church charity fund,” Becker said. “It would be a continuous charity fund to be accessed in the event of a national or international disaster.” Student clubs could also petition to use the fund to finance projects and trips to areas in need of aid, Becker said. Senators also talked about the details of the upcoming home game weekend. The Stanford pep rally on Friday will bring the student body back to Purcell Pavilion, student body president Catherine Soler said. Each dorm will not have a designated seating area, so students should arrive as early as possible with their residence hall before the pep rally begins at 6 p.m., she said. “We will definitely have good conversations next week about what format we like best for pep rallies,” Soler said. Feedback from the Stanford pep rally will continue efforts to host pep rallies that are more oriented toward students, Soler said.last_img read more

Cyber hackers publish medical data for Farah, Nadal and Rose

first_imgBy Alan Baldwin in LondonOLYMPIC champions Mo Farah, Rafael Nadal and Justin Rose were among athletes targeted on Monday in the latest leak of confidential medical documents that the world anti-doping agency (WADA) says were hacked by a Russian cyber espionage group.Britain’s Farah became only the second man to retain the 5 000 and 10 000 metres Olympic titles at the Rio de Janeiro Games last month while compatriot Rose won the first gold medal in golf for 112 years.Spaniard Nadal, a 14-time tennis grand slam winner, won Olympic men’s doubles gold with Marc Lopez. He also won the men’s singles title at the 2008 Beijing Games but missed London 2012 due to a knee injury.WADA has said it believes the hackers, named as APT28 and Fancy Bears, gained access to its anti-doping administration and management system (ADAMS) via an IOC-created account for the Rio Games.Documents relating to Farah, and published on the fancybear.net website, showed that the distance runner had no active Therapeutic Use Exemptions (TUEs) at the time of the Olympics.WADA has said the “criminal attack” has recklessly exposed personal data in an attempt to smear reputations.The agency has also said it believes the attacks are being carried out as retaliation for investigations that exposed state-sponsored doping in Russia.Fancy Bear has previously posted data for U.S. athletes Simone Biles, Elena Delle Donne, and Serena and Venus Williams as well as Tour de France-winning British cyclists Bradley Wiggins and Chris Froome.He received intravenous infusions of saline solution, morphine sulphate and vicodin administered orally during a period in hospital between July 3 and 5, 2014 when he had collapsed after a training run.Prior to that, he was given a TUE for an 80mg dosage of the corticosteroid triamcinolone in October 2008.Rose had authorisation for daily dosages of the anti-inflammatory drug prednisolone between May this year and June 20.The documents relating to Nadal, who was out for more than two months with a wrist injury that forced him to miss the French Open and Wimbledon before the Olympics, showed exemptions in 2009 and 2012.The fourth release of data so far concerned 26 athletes from Argentina, Belgium, Burundi, Canada, Denmark, France, Britain, Hungary, Spain and the United States.Other high-profile names included Burundi’s Francine Niyonsaba, British cyclist Callum Skinner and double Olympic rowing gold medallist Helen Glover.TUEs allow athletes to take banned substances for verified medical needs and there is no suggestion any of those named have broken any ruleslast_img read more