Tag: 南京夜生活

Time to think about the best watch for back to school

0 Comment

first_img Sarah Tew/CNET Apple Watch Series 4 reading • Time to think about the best watch for back to school Apple revamped the whole feel of its watch a year ago, adding a larger screen and some extras like ECG to spot-check your heart rhythm, or fall detection. You could also just get the older Series 3 and still have GPS, music, on-wrist Apple Pay and speakerphone functions. Apple Watch is absolutely the best way to stay connected on your wrist, and it’s a fun fitness companion. But its limited battery life and higher price, and need for an iPhone to use, might not fit everyone. (And again, you should wait to see what Apple announces in September!)A note on pricing: For the Series 4, don’t pay more than $350 for the 40mm version, or $380 for the 44mm (with standard bands and no cellular). That’s $50 off the Apple Store price, and the general “street price” for these models. For the Series 3, you want to get the 38mm for $200 or less, the 42mm for $230 or less — that’s $80 off list price. See at Amazon 1 Fitbit Versa Lite Read about the Garmin Vivoactive 3 Comment Aug 30 • Hate subscription software? Photoshop Elements and Premiere Elements are on sale for $60 each Read about Fitbit’s latest trackers Read the Amazfit Bip review Aug 29 • Best college laptops for 2019 If you’re a serious runner who wants something with longer battery life for GPS, Garmin’s smartwatch might be for you. It lasts about 13 hours on standalone GPS, or a week for everyday on-wrist use. A step-up model offers music, if you think you’d want that. Aug 29 • Our favorite back-to-school picks for 2019 Fitbit’s attempt at a smartwatch works best as a casual way to track stats and load a variety of crazy watch faces. It can be worn while swimming (but only the step-up regular Versa can do swim tracking), has a longer battery life (lasting four days) so it can track sleep, gets phone notifications, and tracks heart rate, but it doesn’t have GPS (you can use your phone’s GPS to track runs, though). Still, for everyday fitness, it’s an excellent budget choice at around $160. But again, you can also wait to see if any price drops or updates come in the fall. Amazfit Bip Read the Samsung Galaxy Watch Active review Josh Miller/CNET See at Amazon Wearable Tech Angela Lang/CNET Fitbit Fitness Apple Share your voice See at Amazon Aug 29 • Save up to $500 on Microsoft Surface laptops and tablets Samsung may also have a new watch soon, so let’s see what happens. But the version that arrived in the spring is a great, affordable, full-featured $200 watch that can do almost anything, and pairs well with Android phones. Samsung’s fitness tracking features are also a lot better than you might think. Samsung Galaxy Watch Active Samsung Galaxy Watch Active and Apple Watch Series 4. Angela Lang/CNET School is closer than you think, and odds are, you’ll be running around a lot once you’re back. Something useful on your wrist could help, as long as you know what you want to use it for. Smartwatches and fitness trackers can be fantastic companions for a busy campus life, from the obviously popular Apple Watch to social fitness companions like Fitbit. Whether you value staying connected to your phone, high-performance fitness tracking, or a little helpful motivation on a budget, here are some solid picks.These all come with one giant caveat, however: Students may wish to ask for an IOU for now. That’s because Apple is expected to release its newest watches in the fall — and other brands may well follow. That said, if you need something now, here are our top picks.Note that CNET may get a share of revenue from the sale of the products featured on this page.   See at Amazon Back-to-School Tech Gift Guide Best laptops for college students: We’ve got an affordable laptop for every student. Best live TV streaming services: Ditch your cable company but keep the live channels and DVR. Garmin Vivoactive 3 The Bip is affordable, and its battery life and always-on screen are great. It’s almost like a modern version of a Casio watch. The phone app feels a little off-brand compared to Samsung, Fitbit, Google and Apple’s apps, but it’s fine. The best part of Bip is how long the battery life is (weeks), and how it can be worn anywhere, even swimming. The Bip can do some basic fitness tracking, but it’s great as a casual watch that can also get phone notifications. And it’s usually $80 or less.Read: Apple Watch vs. Amazfit Bip See All • See at Amazon Sarah Tew/CNET Tags Andrew Hoyle/CNET Read the Apple Watch Series 4 reviewlast_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Former Unilever COO Harish Manwani may succeed Cyrus Mistry as Tata Sons

0 Comment

first_imgHarish Manwani, the former chief operating officer of Unilever, is being considered as the top contender in the running for the chairmanship of Tata Sons.Manwani was appointed as the global COO for Unilever in June 2011. He retired in December 2014, after more than 38 years of service.According to Sky News, the 62-year-old is likely to replace ousted Tata Sons chairman Cyrus Mistry. The names of Natarajan Chandrasekaran, Indra Nooyi and Arun Sarin are also being considered.Tata Sons, the over 100 billion dollar conglomerate, has set up a team to scout for a new chairman within next four months. The team includes Ratan Tata, Venu Srinivasan, Amit Chandra, Ronen Sen and Lord Kumar Bhattacharyya.The Cyrus Mistry-Ratan Tata row has led to many unsavoury developments since the ouster of Mistry on October 24, including high-profile exits and defamation suits. Nusli Wadia, whose ouster from many Tata Group companies is almost imminent, has threatened to sue the Tata Group for “false” and “defamatory” allegations made against him.Despite his removal, Mistry continues to head the group’s several listed firms such as Tata Motors, Tata Power, Tata Steel and Tata Chemicals. Several Tata Group firms have called for EGMs, with Tata Consultancy Services on December 13, Indian Hotels on December 20, Tata Motors on December 22 and Tata Chemicals on December 23 to seek Mistry’s ouster.Tata Power will be declaring its Q2 results on November 29.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Can This 24YearOlds Startup Prevent 86 Percent of Traffic Accidents

0 Comment

first_img Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 4 min read March 15, 2017 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Though convenient, automotive transportation can be deadly. Over 35,000 people lost their lives in traffic accidents in 2015 (the last full year available), and more than 30,000 fatalities occur annually.Related: Is America Too ‘Safe’ for Innovation? Or Will Driverless Cars Ever Have Their Day? Prevention is is an area where businesses are active — with some working to create autonomous vehicles that eliminate human error altogether, and other, perhaps more practical, startups, striving to assist business owners, teens and other drivers to curb their driving mistakes, some of them fatal.Certainly, autonomous cars are nice, in theory, but a number of logistical and legal hurdles are preventing them from becoming a practical reality. Nor is their widespread adoption likely any time soon.But, what if a new app and technology could prevent up to 86 percent of traffic accidents altogether?Enter ITFT Innovative Technology for Transportation (ITFT) is a North Carolina-based company, currently in its crowdfunding stage, which has designed a Safe Driving System, (SDS) whose up-and-coming app and technology is designed to prevent speeding and reckless driving.The U.S. Department of Transportation has calculated that 94 percent of all traffic accidents are attributable to human error, so the Safe Driving System is designed to reduce those errors through controls and notifications that limit driver behavior.Compatible with any car manufactured since 1996, the Safe Driving System will be targeted primarily toward teenagers (and their reasonably worried parents). When the SDS is installed, parents will receive alerts whenever their teens drive over a designated speed threshold and when they make it to their destinations safely (or, less happily, when an accident has occurred).Related: Driverless Cars Won’t Make Roadways Perfectly SafeThe technology, however, also applies to businesses: It will be available to employers to keep track of their company vehicles and employee-drivers.Plus, individuals can use the SDS to gain a better awareness of their personal driving habits and to block distracting apps on their mobile devices (while they retain access to necessary phone and navigation functions).ITFT is further working on a “panic button,” designed for integration with ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft. If pressed, the panic button will simultaneously alert local authorities and force the vehicle to come to a stop, while recording video and audio of the scene. Then, the door will automatically unlock, allowing the passenger to exit safely. The button will be available for both drivers and passengers.The competitionITFT isn’t the first company developing technology designed to help drivers and prevent traffic accidents, but it is one of the only solutions capable of issuing both speed and reckless driving alerts. Zubie, for example, was designed as a GPS tracker for teenage drivers, but can’t alert parents when their teenagers are going over the speed limit.Instead, its technology is designed to send alerts when the car goes over a manually set speed. Hum, by Verizon, works similarly.Almost every solution now on the market will come with a monthly or yearly fee, usually in the neighborhood of $10 per month. The founderThe founder of ITFT, Matthew Godley, has said he was inspired to create the system after experiencing the deaths of community members in traffic accidents. Still relatively young, Godley, now 24, has assembled a team of engineers, innovators and advisors to help make his vision a reality.Start EngineCurrently, ITFT is listed on Start Engine, a crowdfunding website designed to help entrepreneurs meet their fundraising goals with the help of the general public. Until the offering deadline of April 2, 2017, investors can purchase up to 100,000 series B non-voting common shares of the company at a price of $10 per share. The future of accident prevention Chances are, the SDS is just the beginning of a new wave of technology aimed to help control traffic accidents in this country. Some companies are targeting the improvement of vehicles, with higher safety standards, automated elements, and in some cases, full autonomy. However, the other side of the equation is the driver: Until autonomous cars become reality, controlling driver behavior is the best tool available for limiting traffic accidents.Related: This Startup Aims to Make Sure Driverless Cars Don’t Run You OverThe more we learn about our own driving habits and the driving habits of our loved ones, the fewer risks we’ll face in our daily commutes and adventures. And while our dashboards currently provide us with baseline information to guide our operations, new technology like the SDS will help us alter our behaviors and motivate us to drive more responsibly. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Satellite still has the edge over other distributi

0 Comment

first_imgSatellite still has the edge over other distribution technologies in CEE, according to a panel of operators speaking at the Digital TV CEE conference in Budapest.Satellite operators has the advantage of delivering content to a large-scale audience at a fixed cost and because there is no economic case for investing in high-capacity fixed networks across much of the region, according to panelists.Stanislav Georgiev, head of media broadcasting, Telekom Austria Group said satellite penetration in the region was up to 45% in some markets. “It is going to grow because pay TV is still growing in the region. It has an important role to play in delivering pay TV revenues,” he said, noting that there has been a lot of discussion around “new things” such as multiscreen TV and OTT that “deliver about 1% of revenues”.Georgiev said that satellite operators would be unable to do much about the trend towards OTT and non-linear viewing and may need to consolidate in a few years’ time. “There is a trend and an increase in non-linear consumption, but is it at the expense of linear consumption. We are not that scared that linear  is going to disappear. We see growth of subscribers and growth in our revenue in the coming years,” he said.Georgiev said that the CEE region is more conservative about changing viewing habits and less able and willing to spend a lot of money on additional services. Telekom Austria typically bundles satellite TV with broadband and mobile services, including mobile broadband, and TV is seen as a way to provide a full service rather than a huge revenue generator in its own right.Apolotolos Triantafyllou, SVP of sales for DACH, CEE, Israel, Caucuasus and Central Asia, Eutelsat said that satellite still had a role to play “because there isn’t enough money to build terrestrial networks – it’s as simple as that”.Operators nevertheless admitted that growth is declining.Tryantafyllou said that markets are maturing and growth is slowing. However,  he  said there is also “nothing to prevent us distributing OTT. Eutelsat is trying hard to come up with an OTT over satellite solution. We think the industry should do the same. If broadband can be delivered via satellite, OTT is an opportunity rather than a problem.”Eyal Altshuler, VP sales CEE, Spacecom said that growth was mostly coming from within existing customers rather than from new launches, with HD and now 4K providing additonal demand for capacity.Lev Petukhov, head of web projects department at Russian satellite pay TV operator NTV+, said that satellite would remain at the core of NTV+’s business. He said that distributing content to a country like Russia had its challenges. He said that the operators could provide satellite services for summer homes and complement that with IP-delivered services in cities to apartment complexes.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Mark Harrison The BBCs director of transformation

0 Comment

first_imgMark HarrisonThe BBC’s director of transformation for design and engineering, Mark Harrison, is stepping down to lead the Digital Production Partnership (DPP).Harrison is due to leave the BBC on March 31 to devote more time to the DPP, where he has been seconded part time from the BBC since April 2015 to work as its managing director.Harrison will continue to act as MD of the DPP, while upping his work around strategic leadership, authorship and presentation of the DPP’s insights, membership growth and international relationships.The DPP is a membership-based, not-for-profit company, founded by its shareholders – UK terrestrial broadcasters ITV, the BBC and Channel 4.The DPP defines itself not as a standards body, but as an organisation that aims, through its membership, to bring the understanding of business needs and requirements to make common standards and specifications effective.Its three areas of work revolve around generating insights, enabling change and creating market opportunities.“We are thrilled with the success of the DPP to date and want to build on this in a way that will keep pace with ever-accelerating industry demands,” said DPP chair and ITV’s director of broadcast operations, Helen Stevens.“Having more of Mark helps us do just that – he is a great leader for the DPP and has been instrumental in our achievements so far. We are delighted to have more of his time and look forward to delivering in 2017”.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Scripps Networks Interactive is launching Food Net

0 Comment

first_imgScripps Networks Interactive is launching Food Network as a free-to-air channel in Italy. The channel will launch on May 8 as the first dedicated multi-platform food entertainment channel in the country, according to Scripps.o accompany the on-air offering, Food Network will launch a localized website featuring tested recipe collections, tips and food hacks. In addition to a social media presence on Facebook and Instagram to showcase exclusive clips and behind the scenes content.Scripps Networks has appointed Viacom International Media Networks Pubblicita’ & Brand Solutions to represent Food Network’s advertising sales efforts for both linear and digital properties.Scripps already operates its Fine Living lifestyle channel as a free-to-air network on the Italian digital-terrestrial platform. According ot the company, Fine Living grew its ratings in the country by 33% last year and achieved a 36% in total TV share.Phillip LuffFood Network will offer a mix of local original productions and flagship international shows across genres including culinary entertainment, competitions series and in the kitchen cooking techniques. In addition to original local commissions, which will be produced in Italian, all programming will be dubbed in Italian.“The launch of Food Network in Italy, a key growth market for Scripps Networks Interactive, represents a significant milestone in the global expansion of this brand,” said Phillip Luff, managing director, UK & EMEA, Scripps Networks Interactive.“Italy offers a rich and dynamic culture, where food is in people’s DNA, and Food Network’s unique and entertaining programming will engage the many millions of Italians who celebrate food.”last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

By Marin Katusa Chief Energy Investment Strategis

0 Comment

first_imgBy Marin Katusa, Chief Energy Investment StrategistIn its later days, the Soviet Union was desperate for strong leadership. Instead the country found itself with a succession of weak leaders who kept dying on the job.Leonid Brezhnev helmed the country for 18 years until his death in 1982. Yuri Andropov took over after Brezhnev’s passing but suffered renal failure within a few months. He continued to govern from the hospital for another year before dying just 15 months after taking office.The next leader of the USSR did not even last that long. Konstantin Chernenko was 72 years old and in poor health when sworn in as First Secretary in early 1984. In March 1985, after only 13 months in office, Chernenko died, the third Soviet leader to die in less than three years.When Ronald Reagan was informed of Chernenko’s passing, the US president supposedly said, “How am I supposed to get any place with the Russians if they keep dying on me?”This may be just what the next US president has to say about Saudi Arabia.The resemblances are uncanny. The USSR in its later years was a socially repressed and ethnically divided society in a resource-rich but economically poor country, led by an autocratic ensemble of old men who kept dying and yet had no clear plans for succession, set smack in the middle of a global battle for power.You only have to change a few words for the description to suit today’s Saudi Arabia.Saudi is not poor, but it is facing major economic challenges as dramatic increases in social spending and domestic fuel consumption eat through the kingdom’s all-important oil revenues.Saudi may not be fighting the Cold War, but it is smack in the middle of the Middle East, an ever-tumultuous region currently rocking and roiling more than usual as the Arab Spring challenges longstanding autocratic assumptions, while war-torn Syria and defiant Iran tip the delicate Sunni-Shia religious balance in the world’s most important oil region.While the House of Saud might present itself as a stable, strong, and cohesive royal family, in truth the king and his successors are growing old and incapacitated in a throne room full of competing contenders. Meanwhile, the only other organized social group in the country – the Islamists – are waiting just outside the door.You want a surefire way to send oil to $300 a barrel, to see Saudi troops attack Tehran, or to strangle US oil imports? Try a failed succession battle in the House of Saud that ends up destroying the whole family and ushering in an Islamist age in Saudi Arabia.There is little that could rock the oil world more. And it is all too likely.A Shaky House of SaudThe king of Saudi Arabia, Abdullah Aziz bin Saud, is almost 90 years old. In Saudi Arabia’s royal system, the throne passes not from father to son but from brother to brother. The problem with the system is that none of King Abdullah’s brothers are exactly young and full of vigor.Crown Prince Salman, next in line to the throne, is already 76. He got the Crown Prince nod after two of his elder brothers died. The remaining brothers now average 80 years of age.A king who ascends the throne in his seventh or eighth decade is unlikely to have the energy or even the time to enact significant reforms. And reforms are needed. I’m not pushing democracy – Saudis don’t generally want democracy. What I’m talking about are the endemic problems that are battering the world’s biggest oil producer: high unemployment, a corrupt bureaucracy, a crippled economy, a weak education system, and a society full of frustrated youth.While the country crumbles, the three pillars that have long supported the royal family are also weakening. Massive oil revenues, which have long been used to buy public support, are being squeezed by sharply increased domestic demand. The Wahhabi Islamic establishment that supported the House of Saud is increasingly fractious and is losing credibility. And the royal family itself is struggling to maintain its rock-solid façade after losing two crown princes to old age in just a few years.The country’s foreign relations are little better. The Middle East is in turmoil, and Saudi Arabia’s longstanding alliance with the United States is in distress.Alongside these tangible problems is a multitude of intangible challenges that are revolutionizing the country. The regime used to control the population by controlling access to information, but of course that age is now almost over. The Internet has connected young Saudis with the rest of the world, and that worldview is prompting them to question some of the rules of their society.Even the religious establishment in Saudi Arabia is seeing its power eroded. Young Saudis are increasingly independent, using the Koran to guide their decisions without following specific decrees from a particular religious leader.The fact is, Saudi society today bears little resemblance to the passive masses of just a decade ago, and a decade from now the difference will be even bigger.Trying to lead his country through these modern challenges is a 90-year-old king, backed by a 76-year-old crown prince and their octogenarian brothers.Not surprisingly, it’s not working very well.New Battles, Old TacticsWhen the Arab Spring in Tunisia and Egypt sparked protests in Saudi Arabia, the protesters were not demanding democracy or trying to oust the royal family. No, the young Saudis who filled those streets had more basic demands.At the top of the list is jobs – 60% of Saudi’s citizens are under the age of 20, and the unemployment rate for young adults is nearly 40%. These young people want to be given the opportunity to better themselves and their country, but instead they cannot find work and live instead on government handouts.Adding fuel to the fire, those handouts have been shrinking. Saudi Arabia’s population has skyrocketed in the last half century. In 1972 the country had 6 million inhabitants; by 1992 that number had climbed to 17 million; and today there are 28 million Saudi Arabians. Oil incomes have climbed too, but not nearly apace. As such the government has been struggling to keep the population appeased with fewer dollars per head every year.The population keeps growing, and each person in the kingdom keeps using more oil. The result: shrinking oil revenues have to go further. It’s not a recipe for success, but when you’re 89 years old, you go with what has worked in the past.And that is precisely what happened in the wake of the Arab Spring: King Abdullah drowned the protestors in money – a $130-billion social-spending package that built new housing, increased payrolls, and boosted unemployment payouts. Saudi Arabia’s entire annual budget is just $180 billion, so the king almost doubled spending to appease the protestors.This tactic cannot work forever. Even in Saudi Arabia there is only so much oil money. The Saudi royals already need an oil price of at least $80 a barrel to support all their social programs, and with domestic oil consumption rocketing upward, that baseline price will keep climbing.But the unrest continues.The Summer of Saudi DiscontentAfter King Abdullah offered billions of dollars in social spending, many protestors went home… except in the country’s oil-rich eastern provinces, where the protests never stopped.For the last 18 months Saudis in the eastern Qatif region have been demonstrating regularly, demanding the release of all political prisoners, freedom of expression, and an end to ethnic and religious discrimination. When Saudi security forces turned on the demonstrators last November, killing five, the protests took on a distinctly anti-Saud tone.In June, King Abdullah ordered the country’s security forces to go on a state of high alert due to what he called a “turbulent situation” in the eastern region.The unspoken side to the situation is that the turbulence is distinctly religious.Most Saudis are Sunni Muslims, and Sunni Islam is the only allowed religion in the country. However, 15% of the country’s inhabitants are Shia, and they have faced direct and indirect persecution for decades.Guess where the Shia live? In those turbulent, oil-rich eastern provinces.That is one aspect of Saudi discontent. But there are more.For example, last week Saudi security forces raided al-Qaida cells in Jeddah and Riyadh. Evidence recovered during the raids supports the suspicion that a new branch in the Arabian Peninsula is gathering momentum for a wave of attacks. The royal family is at the top of their list of targets. Toppling the House of Saud would be a major victory for al Qaida, simply because of the instability that would ensue.All told, between external threats, internal divisions, and domestic struggles, the Saudi royal family looks very unstable indeed. So what would happen if the House of Saud crumbled?Remember, religion is the only social structure in Saudi Arabia. There are no political parties, unions, or social organizations, aside from a few charities run by members of the royal family. Were the House of Saud to fail, the only candidates ready to step up would be the Islamists.The shift to Islamist rule in Egypt has made the world pretty nervous. Longstanding allegiances are in limbo, and long-term relationships are changing.Imagine if it happened in Saudi Arabia.Islamist leadership in Saudi would not be the moderate, democratic version we’re seeing in Egypt. The Islamists in Saudi Arabia are Wahhabi Muslims, who practice the strictest and most conservative version of the religion. I can see these imams making several moves.First, a Saudi Arabia led by Wahhabi Islamists would not stay at peace with the Shia Islamic Republic of Iran. Both branches of Islam believe the other has strayed so far from the path that its followers are infidels. Odds of open war between Saudi Arabia and Iran would shoot sky-high the moment Islamists took power in Saudi Arabia.Even worse, a Wahhabi Islamist Saudi Arabia might well turn its strongest weapon against the infidels of the West – by turning off the oil taps. It would be the 1973 oil crisis all over again, but in an even more oil-dependent world.The price of oil shot up 300% in six months during the oil crisis. Today, that would mean an oil price of $300 per barrel.It would also mean the end of the era of friendly US-Saudi relations… and the demise of the petrodollar. That is a story in itself – one of great significance to anyone who owns US dollars. I have discussed previously how a US-Saudi deal to only use dollars to trade oil created a deep pool of support for the US’s currency – and what will happen if the petrodollar dies. The short version is that as the global oil trade moves away from US dollars into yuan, yen, rubles, and pesos, the world would have yet another reason to devalue the dollar.Expensive oil, open Sunni-Shia war in the Middle East, the loss of one of the world’s biggest oil producers as a stalwart ally, and an inevitable increase in religious politics across the Arabian Peninsula – such are the likely outcomes if the House of Saud comes tumbling down.It is not inevitable. There are 7,000 princes in the Saud royal family, the result of multiple wives and lots of progeny. In that mix there is undoubtedly a prince with the right mix of progressive thought and religious reverence to lead Saudi Arabia through its succession and into the future.But whenever a throne room is that crowded, it is very easy for a brawl to break out, depriving that perfect prince of his chance and giving the Islamists their opening.Either way, oil investors with the right picks in their portfolio will prosper, and the Casey Research energy team will be available to guide you along the way.Investment markets are getting more interesting by the day right now, and nowhere is this more true than in the energy sector. I’ll be speaking on that topic at the upcoming New Orleans Investing Conference, held October 24-27. Doug Casey and Louis James, our metals and mining investment strategist, will also be presenting. Check it out at the link above – we hope to see you there. Additional Links and ReadsMarin Katusa Discusses Opportunities in the Coal Sector (BNN)Coal prices have slid significantly over the last year, and our chief energy Investment strategist believes that spells opportunity in the long run. In this Business News Network interview, Marin explains that the cure for low coal prices is more low prices. He also reveals when investors should start picking up their favorite stocks in anticipation of a rebound.Rail Gains Steam As a Crude Oil Mover (Globe and Mail)Canada’s oil patch is quietly sending large new volumes of oil on rail cars, as it fights to overcome opposition to plans for new pipelines to the US Gulf Coast and Canada’s west coast. Some 80,000 barrels of Canadian oil are being moved by rail every day, up dramatically from just 5,000 barrels a day last year, and volumes are expected to rise to 200,000 barrels per day next year.Fracking Banned by Quebec Government (Vancouver Sun)The new government of the province of Quebec has a very clear position on fracking: it wants it banned. New Natural Resources Minister Martine Ouellet said she doesn’t believe the method can ever be done safely, and says her government will push for a complete moratorium on exploration and exploitation of shale gas.“Smart” Money Targeting Low-Priced Coal Assets (Globe and Mail)Sliding iron ore and coal prices have touched off a spate of asset sales, boosting deal activity in what has been a lean year in the mining sector. Cashed-up Japanese, Korean, and Chinese buyers have their eyes peeled for bargains. The coal sector is one of their top targets, especially as many analysts believe the depressed sector may have reached its bottom.India Finally Makes a Move on Canadian Energy Assets (Financial Post)India’s national oil companies have been eyeing Canada’s oil sands for at least a decade. Now it seems they are finally making a move: unconfirmed reports suggest that three of India’s largest oil companies have jointly bid for the northern Alberta assets controlled by ConocoPhillips’ Canadian division, valued at $5 billion. It’s a reminder that China is not the only populous and energy-hungry nation looking to secure resources to fuel its future.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Click here to download or listen on your mobile de

0 Comment

first_img Click here to download or listen on your mobile device Uranium’s rise looks like as close to a sure thing as the stock market ever gets… but that does not mean that every company will profit. As Marin explained in the interview, the permitting process is grueling, requiring expertise and tenacity. Investors need to know how best to deploy their resources. That’s why Casey Research brought together some of today’s experts in the field of uranium and nuclear power to discuss the issues. The resulting webinar is titled The Myth of American Energy Independence: Is Nuclear the Ultimate Contrarian Investment?, and its premier will be Tuesday, May 21 at 2 p.m. EDT. Listen to experts including Spencer Abraham, Barbara Thomas Judge, and Rick Rule discuss what’s going on and how to take advantage of the forming trends to position yourself for life-changing gains. Learn more and sign up now. Why are countries with energy reserves building nuclear power plants and planning more of them? Can the nations that turned away from nuclear power after the Fukushima disaster stay away from it? In this brief but highly informative interview with Investors Daily (his interview is the third segment on May 15), Casey Research Chief Energy Investment Strategist Marin Katusa makes a strong case for an exceptionally powerful bull market shaping up in the uranium sector.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Editors note Today were sharing another fantas

0 Comment

first_imgEditor’s note: Today, we’re sharing another fantastic crisis investing opportunity… Yesterday, we told you about the huge profit potential right now in Zimbabwe. In today’s essay, Crisis Investing editor Nick Giambruno and Casey Research founder Doug Casey talk about their latest trip to the war-torn country of Ukraine—and share the incredible bargains they found… (And make sure to read through to the end for details on our special Crisis Investing deal that ends tonight.) Nick Giambruno: So Doug, why don’t you give a little background on our recent trip to Poland and the Ukraine? Doug Casey: Well, my first trip to Eastern Europe was in the late ‘60s, during the Soviet era. But I’ve spent relatively little time in Eastern Europe, and this was my first time to Poland and Ukraine. I’m favorably impressed with both countries—the societies, the opportunities, and with the way things look. That’s contrary to what most people think, especially regarding Ukraine; they think of it as a warzone. But the secession in the Donetsk and Luhansk provinces doesn’t affect the rest of the country. Nick Giambruno: It’s my first time to the Ukraine, too, and it’s definitely a lot different than what you would see in the media. Actually, this kind of perception gap is just the kind of thing we look for when seeking out good value around the world. Doug Casey: Yes. The previous democratically elected president there was overthrown in a coup orchestrated by the U.S. government. He was terminally, even comically, corrupt; which is absolutely typical for ex-Soviet countries. The new guy is equally corrupt, but at least he’s a U.S. puppet. There don’t seem to be any foreign tourists in Kiev at all; that’s a good sign. We’re looking at real estate and stock prices, and they appear to present tremendous opportunities. Of course most people would say, “Well, there’s no way I’m going to live in the Ukraine. That must be a horrible place.” But the fact is that Kiev as a city dates from the 500s. It’s an ancient city. It’s a beautiful city. It’s a delightful place to be, totally undiscovered, and very, very cheap. Nick Giambruno: In terms of lifestyle, and at least in the summer months, Eastern Europe is not a bad place to be if you want to have a high-quality life without breaking the bank. I’d rate it as far better than spending your time and money in, say, Paris or London. Doug Casey: Oh, absolutely. If you walk down the street in Warsaw or Kiev, you’re going to see that everybody’s a Pole or a Ukrainian; neither place—but especially not Ukraine—gets many tourists. You walk down the street in London or Paris, I question whether you’ll even see a Brit or a Frenchman. In London, the plurality seems to be immigrants from the subcontinent. In Paris, it’s immigrants from France’s defunct African empire. In both countries, the colonizers are now themselves being colonized. Eastern Europe, however, for all the bad PR it gets, is generally crime-free. So popular perceptions and what you read about in the mass media are totally inaccurate, in my opinion. Nick Giambruno: Well our Polish colleague would say, “Yeah, so what? We steal a few cars. But, you Germans killed my grandfather.” A sad, but kind of funny joke, and it usually silences any complaints about the stolen cars. Doug Casey: That’s right. Germans suffer from a huge national guilt complex. You need only reference WW2 in the most oblique way to make them curl up in a ball and hide under the table. We actually came to Poland because you, Nick, put together the highlights of my three financial books into a new book that covers economic and investing principles in a timeless, as opposed to topical, manner. We got along very well with the Polish publisher, Jan Fijor. I met him at La Estancia de Cafayate, incidentally. In Poland—like everywhere else in the world—the publishing and media business is very much controlled by statists and collectivists. So I go out of my way to support the rare individualist or libertarian. My upcoming novel, Speculator, which is going to be released in a couple of weeks, is also going to be published in Poland. So perhaps I’ll eventually relate to Poland the way Jerry Lewis used to relate to France. Nick Giambruno: One thing that was particularly surprising was how large, and how knowledgeable, the free market libertarian community in Poland was. These guys were philosophically and intellectually sound. Was that surprising to you, too? Doug Casey: Yes. It was hard to believe that when we gave speeches to the audience that Jan put together, there were over 700 people in attendance. These weren’t just people rounded up from the highways and the byways, these were real libertarians. I would say that a third of the audience were anarcho-capitalists. And this couldn’t have happened in any other place in Europe. I don’t think there’s another place in Europe where you could get even 50 libertarians in the same room. But perhaps Poland has an excellent tradition of freedom because it’s a borderland. They speak a Slavic language, but use Latin script. And the prevailing religious tradition is Catholicism, not a variety of Eastern orthodoxy. Nick Giambruno: It might have to do with their history of dealing with aggressors. In particular the Russians and Germans. We heard another funny anecdote from Poland. If the Germans and the Russians attack you at the same time, as a Polish patriot, who do you fight first? And the answer is, well, you have to fight the Germans first because it’s your duty, and then you fight the Russians…for pleasure. So business before pleasure. Doug Casey: Poland, like Ukraine, lies mostly on a flat, open plain that has made them something of a highway for invading armies. But I think that era in history is over, for a number of reasons—notwithstanding the best efforts of NATO and the U.S. to provoke the Russians. I could live very happily, and very inexpensively, in a luxury apartment, in either Warsaw or Kiev. Nick Giambruno: That brings up another point, how cheap these places are. Temporarily cheap I should say, at least for people who hold U.S. dollars. I thought Poland in particular was favorable. The ratio of the cost of living to the quality of life was heavily skewed in your favor. Poland almost reminds me of being the Argentina or Colombia of Europe, meaning it’s an excellent place to live on the very cheap. It’s an excellent place for “lifestyle arbitrage.” Did you get that same impression, too? Doug Casey: I absolutely did. Both cities are very civilized, lots of people speak good English. And there’s reason to think both these countries will improve significantly. Nick Giambruno: For example, from the middle of Warsaw to the airport we took an Uber taxi and it only cost $5. Doug Casey: It’s as cheap as it was in Argentina during the good old days, during the crisis. We went out to one of the best restaurants in Kiev. There were six of us. We spared no expense, far more food than any of us could eat. Excellent food, and far more wine and vodka than we should have drunk. The total bill, for drinks, dinner, dessert, including the tip, was $130 for six people for a veritable feast. I don’t know what it would be in New York, probably five times or even ten times that much at a similar restaurant. I wonder if The Russian Tea Room near Carnegie Hall is still open… Editor’s note: This is your last chance to take advantage of our special offer for Nick’s popular Crisis Investing newsletter. Until tonight only, you can save 60% off the regular price when you join Crisis Investing. And as part of our trial membership, you’ll have three months to test out Nick’s research risk-free and decide if it’s right for you. It’s the perfect time to take advantage of the lucrative crisis opportunities shaping up in today’s market. But again, you must act now…this offer closes at midnight—click here to get started. Alert: Your Special Access Disappears Tonight Until midnight, you have a shot to join what may be the boldest venture in Casey Research history. In short, it’s a way to get ahead of the major financial shock Doug Casey sees unfolding…and potentially make $1,000s month after month in 2016 – right from your home computer. Click here for full details. Nick Giambruno and Doug Casey in Kiev’s Maidan, the scene of a recent and bloody revolution. Nick Giambruno: When people think of these Eastern European cities on the Russian periphery they probably imagine columns of soulless, Soviet-style buildings. But that’s not what we found here. Doug Casey: No, not in Kiev. Although, in truth, I’m long past the stage where I visit old churches and government buildings almost anywhere. Of course, Warsaw was a little bit different because the Germans and then the Russians totally flattened the place during the Second World War. But Kiev is very much an old town with lots of culture. The Germans like to joke that Eastern Europe should advertise itself by saying, “Come to Eastern Europe. Your car is waiting for you,” because most of the cars stolen in Germany are exported to the east. Another joke about Eastern Europe is that the main import is stolen cars and the main export is prostitutes. Well, every country has its share of politically incorrect jokes. Regrettably, you hear less of them these days. Psychologically aberrated opinion leaders are trying to turn the whole planet into a dour and humorless “safe space,” where all the delicate little flowers are sheltered from even the slightest microaggression. —center_img – Recommended Links Jim Rickards: “My #1 Way to Profit From Britain’s Exit…” Britain’s exit from the European Union has already sent the markets into a tailspin. The British pound hit a 31-year low… Meanwhile, some investors are already reporting losses in the billions. You don’t want to be caught flat-footed as this situation escalates… Go here now to see the latest update to Jim’s Currency Wars thesis.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

FDA approves new antiviral flu treatment

0 Comment

first_img Source:https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm624226.htm Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 24 2018Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Xofluza (baloxavir marboxil) for the treatment of acute uncomplicated influenza (flu) in patients 12 years of age and older who have been symptomatic for no more than 48 hours.”This is the first new antiviral flu treatment with a novel mechanism of action approved by the FDA in nearly 20 years. With thousands of people getting the flu every year, and many people becoming seriously ill, having safe and effective treatment alternatives is critical. This novel drug provides an important, additional treatment option,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. “While there are several FDA-approved antiviral drugs to treat flu, they’re not a substitute for yearly vaccination. Flu season is already well underway, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends getting vaccinated by the end of October, as seasonal flu vaccine is one of the most effective and safest ways to protect yourself, your family and your community from the flu and serious flu-related complications, which can result in hospitalizations. Yearly vaccination is the primary means of preventing and controlling flu outbreaks.”Related StoriesNaturally occurring human antibody reveals hidden weakness in influenza virusNIAID announces two awards for the study of influenza immunity in kidsStudy shows how elderberry fruit can help fight against influenzaFlu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. When patients with the flu are treated within 48 hours of becoming sick, antiviral drugs can reduce symptoms and duration of the illness.”When treatment is started within 48 hours of becoming sick with flu symptoms, antiviral drugs can lessen symptoms and shorten the time patients feel sick,” said Debra Birnkrant, M.D., director of the Division of Antiviral Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Having more treatment options that work in different ways to attack the virus is important because flu viruses can become resistant to antiviral drugs.”The safety and efficacy of Xofluza, an antiviral drug taken as a single oral dose, was demonstrated in two randomized controlled clinical trials of 1,832 patients where participants were assigned to receive either Xofluza, a placebo, or another antiviral flu treatment within 48 hours of experiencing flu symptoms. In both trials, patients treated with Xofluza had a shorter time to alleviation of symptoms compared with patients who took the placebo. In the second trial, there was no difference in the time to alleviation of symptoms between subjects who received Xofluza and those who received the other flu treatment.The most common adverse reactions in patients taking Xofluza included diarrhea and bronchitis.Xofluza was granted Priority Review under which the FDA’s goal is to take action on an application within an expedited time frame where the agency determines that the drug, if approved, would significantly improve the safety or effectiveness of treating, diagnosing or preventing a serious condition.The FDA granted approval of Xofluza to Shionogi & Co., Ltd.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Tobacco tax battle could torch Montana Medicaid expansion

0 Comment

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 5 2018Montana legislators expanded Medicaid by a very close vote in 2015. They passed the measure with an expiration date: It would sunset in 2019, and all who went onto the rolls would lose coverage unless lawmakers voted to reapprove it.Fearing legislators might not renew funding for Medicaid’s expanded rolls, Montana’s hospitals and health advocacy groups came up with a ballot measure to keep it going — and to pay for it with a tobacco tax hike.If ballot initiative I-185 passes Tuesday, it will mean an additional $2-per-pack tax on cigarettes and levy a tax on e-cigarettes, which are currently not taxed in Montana.The tobacco tax initiative has become the most expensive ballot measure race in Montana history — drawing more than $17 million in opposition funding from tobacco companies alone — in a state with fewer than 200,000 smokers.Amanda Cahill works for the American Heart Association and is a spokeswoman for Healthy Montana, the coalition backing the measure. She said coalition members knew big tobacco would fight back.“We poked the bear, that’s for sure,” Cahill said. “And it’s not because we were all around the table saying, ‘Hey, we want to have a huge fight and go through trauma the next several months.’ It’s because it’s the right thing to do.”Most of the $17 million has come from cigarette maker Altria. According to records from the National Institute on Money in Politics, that’s more money than Altria has spent on any state proposition nationwide since the center started keeping track in 2004.Meanwhile, backers of I-185 have spent close to $8 million on the initiative, with most of the money coming from the Montana Hospital Association.“What we want to do is — No. 1 — stop Big Tobacco’s hold on Montana,” Cahill said. Also, she continued, it’s imperative that the nearly 100,000 people in Montana who have gotten Medicaid under the expansion will be able to keep their health care.Cahill said I-185 will allocate plenty of money to cover the expansion, though some lawmakers say the state can’t afford the expansion even with higher taxes.Nancy Ballance, a Republican representative in the Montana state Legislature, opposes the measure.“In general I am not in favor of what we like to refer to as ‘sin taxes,’ ” Ballance said. “Those are taxes that someone determines should be [levied] so that you change people’s behavior.”Ballance also isn’t in favor of ballot initiatives that, she said, try to go around what she sees as core functions of the Legislature: deciding how much revenue the state needs, for example, or where it should come from, or how it should be spent.“An initiative like this for a very large policy with a very large price tag — the Legislature is responsible for studying that,” Ballance said. “And they do so over a long period of time, to understand what all the consequences are — intended and otherwise.”Related StoriesResearchers mobilize globally to improve smoking cessation tools as World No Tobacco Day approachesCo-use of cannabis and tobacco associated with worse functioning, problematic behaviorsRecreational cannabis legalization could impact alcohol industry, research showsMost citizens, she said, don’t have the time or expertise to develop that sort of in-depth understanding of a complicated issue.Montana’s initiative to keep Medicaid’s expansion going would be a “double whammy” for tobacco companies, said Ben Miller, the chief strategy officer for the nonprofit Well Being Trust.“People who are covered are more likely to not smoke than people who are uninsured,” said Miller, who has studied tobacco tax policies for years. He notes research showing that people with lower incomes are more likely than those with higher incomes to smoke; and if they’re uninsured, they’re less likely to quit.Federal law requires Medicaid to offer beneficiaries access to medical help to quit smoking.Plus, Miller added, every time cigarette taxes go up — thereby increasing the price per pack — that typically leads to a decrease in the number of people smoking.And that, he said, works against a tobacco company’s business model, “which is, ‘you need to smoke so we can make money.’ ”Ballance agrees that tobacco companies likely see ballot initiatives like I-185 as threats to their core business. But, she said, “for anybody who wants to continue smoking, or is significantly addicted, the cost is not going to prohibit them from smoking.”The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S.Montana’s health department says that each year more than 1,600 people in the state die from tobacco-related illnesses.This story is part of a reporting partnership with Montana Public Radio, NPR and Kaiser Health News. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Pilates exercise program offers many benefits for people with musculoskeletal conditions

0 Comment

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 7 2018A Musculoskeletal Care study is the first to investigate individual perceptions of the impact of a Pilates exercise program on the daily lives of people with chronic conditions.In the study of 15 women and seven men with a range of chronic musculoskeletal conditions—including nonspecific low back pain, peripheral joint osteoarthritis and a range of postsurgical conditions—and an age range of 36 to 83 years, data were collected via digital recordings of four focus groups in three North‐West of England physiotherapy clinics.Related StoriesResearchers identify molecular pathway underpinning exercise and improved motor learningSleep quality and fatigue among women with premature ovarian insufficiencyImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsThe perceived benefits of Pilates aligned with previous work in relation to physical benefits; however, the study revealed additional benefits, such as an increased active lifestyle, psychosocial benefits, and the ability to manage patients’ own condition more effectively, with the net result being a holistic improvement in physical and mental health and positive consequences for social aspects of their lives.”The study was unique in that it investigated individual perceptions of the impact of Pilates on the daily lives of people with a myriad of chronic musculoskeletal conditions. The Pilates based exercise programme was a facilitator to enable the participants to function better and manage their condition more effectively and independently,” said co-author Lynne Gaskell, of the University of Salford, in the UK. “Improving function in meaningful daily activities produced psychological and social benefits that increased motivation to adhere to the program and promote a healthier lifestyle.” Source:https://newsroom.wiley.com/press-release/musculoskeletal-care/pilates-provides-range-benefits-patients-chronic-musculoskeletal-last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Researchers find two connective tissue cells to be linked to worse prognosis

0 Comment

first_img Source:https://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/article/the-wrong-connective-tissue-cells-signal-worse-prognosis-for-breast-cancer-patients Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 4 2018In certain forms of cancer, connective tissue forms around and within the tumor. One previously unproven theory is that there are several different types of connective tissue cells with different functions, which affect the development of the tumor in different ways. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has identified three different types of connective tissue cells. In studies of breast cancer patients, the team found that two of these are linked to a worse prognosis.Cancer arises as a result of mutations and other genetic changes that shut down the control systems for growth that are normally present in our cells. New studies, however, emphasize the importance of the cancer cells’ communication with various cell types in the surrounding tissue, such as connective tissue, blood vessels and immune cells, in allowing the tumor to form, spread and resist treatment.During the development of certain types of cancer, e.g. in the breast, liver and pancreas, the formation of connective tissue around and in the tumor is stimulated. However, researchers have not understood how the connective tissue affects tumor growth. Previous studies support the theory that it either drives the spread of the tumor by stimulating the formation of blood vessels, or that it weakens the immune system. However, inhibiting effects have also been studied, which could mean that the connective tissue encapsulates the tumor, thereby preventing it from spreading.”We have investigated the pattern of gene expression in the connective tissue cells – known as fibroblasts – with a sensitive technique that enables the analysis of one cell at a time. By seeing which genes are active in 768 individual connective tissue cells from a mouse model of breast cancer, we were able to identify three different subgroups of fibroblasts which differ in function and origin”, says Kristian Pietras, research team leader at Lund University.The largest group of connective tissue cells identified by the researchers controls the development of blood vessels; these cells are known as vascular fibroblasts. A second group of connective tissue cells has the task of producing connective tissue proteins that make the tumor stable and facilitate the migration of cells. These cells are called matrix fibroblasts and have been “kidnaped” by the tumor from the normal breast tissue as the tumor grows over them and converts them into helping. Finally, the researchers found a third group of cells, that are actually tumor cells that have disguised themselves as connective tissue cells.Related StoriesCancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells identifiedHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsNew study to ease plight of patients with advanced cancer”It is a well-known fact that tumor cells must undergo a transformation to acquire more connective tissue-like properties in order to be able to spread in the body – a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We were able to follow how, step by step, the malignant cells start to invade surrounding tissue. However, more detailed studies are needed to follow their journey all the way to a metastatic tumor in another organ”, says Michael Bartoschek, who is the principal author of the study.Through precise tissue analyses, the researchers were able to confirm that the three types of fibroblasts are separate cell types which co-exist within different kinds of tumors. When they investigated the significance of the various subgroups of connective tissue cells for breast cancer prognosis, using tissue samples, they found that patients with large numbers of vascular fibroblasts or matrix fibroblasts in their tumors had a worse prognosis, as both these cell types affect the development of metastases.Successful attempts to impede tumor cell communication with surrounding tissue through drugs already exist, but more research is required to find better treatment strategies targeting tumor cell communication, according to the researchers behind the study. The study confirms the old hypothesis that tumors have several different types of connective tissue cells, with different origins. The current findings open up the possibility of developing drugs that shut down specific functions in subgroups of connective tissue cells in order to achieve better therapeutic results with fewer side effects in breast cancer patients.”We are convinced that more knowledge of the cellular structure of tumors and the function of communication between different cell types will enable us to find new ways to treat tumor diseases. In addition, measurements of the number of different connective tissue cells within a tumor can be developed to assess the risk of cancer recurrence in patients”, concludes Kristian Pietras. last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Study finds worse healthrelated quality of life among transgender adults

0 Comment

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 22 2019Transgender adults were more likely to report worse health-related quality of life compared with cisgender adults. This study used data from a large national health survey with an optional sexual orientation and gender identity module, which 36 U.S. states and territories used at least once from 2014 through 2017.The pooled data compared 3,075 transgender adults with about 719,000 cisgender adults. Transgender adults reported being less likely to have health insurance coverage and were more likely to report worse quality of life as measured by a greater likelihood of fair or poor health or severe mental distress. In addition, they reported more recent days of combined poor physical and mental health and activity limitations. The generalizability of these findings is limited because not all states and territories have used the survey’s sexual orientation and gender identity module. The study suggests that all states and territories should use the module so that data from a truly nationwide sample of the transgender population can inform ongoing debates over public accommodations access, nondiscrimination protections and other issues that influence the health of transgender individuals. Source:https://media.jamanetwork.com/news-item/transgender-adults-more-likely-to-report-worse-health-related-quality-of-life/last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Could drones be the solution to traffic gridlock

0 Comment

first_img It seems like an outlandish, space-age fantasy—but some in the burgeoning urban air mobility industry believe short-haul flights in unpiloted electric flying vehicles will be a key answer to gridlock in major metropolitan areas.A number of startups, including Uber Elevate, are working on developing such a system that could transport people and goods. Some have attracted millions of dollars in venture capital funding.Yet there are staggering hurdles, ranging from cost to safety, noise, public acceptance, regulations, space for vertiports, and questions about who would pay for and who would control the infrastructure for such transportation.In metro Atlanta, discussion about the technology’s future has already begun.Georgia Tech this year created a Center for Urban and Regional Air Mobility to explore the development of aircraft for transportation in densely populated urban areas. Professors leading the effort held an urban air mobility workshop in Atlanta in January. Three months later, national industry publication Aviation Week held an urban air mobility conference at the Georgia World Congress Center.”We’re entering this era in large cities where we’re facing intense gridlock and it’s just getting worse,” said Mark Moore, engineering director of Uber’s urban air mobility unit Uber Elevate, at the Georgia Tech conference.The Uber air service his company envisions could potentially cut peak commute times by more than 50 percent, according to Moore. Uber Elevate plans to eventually start demonstration flights of small electric aircraft in Dallas and Los Angeles and launch commercial service in 2023.Georgia Tech professor Brian German, director of the new Center for Urban and Regional Air Mobility, said there are more than 100 electric vertical-takeoff-and-landing aircraft under development by different companies. These aircraft would not be as powerful as helicopters, but would cost much less to operate and maintain, and would be designed for short hops. Could passenger-carrying drones someday be the answer to traffic delays? A survey of 2,500 commuters in Atlanta and other cities is underway to determine the potential demand for an air taxi service for what is now a 30-minute commute, according to Georgia Tech civil engineering professor Laurie Garrow, associate director of the new air mobility center.”We are trying to understand different factors that will help adoption, or the barriers for urban air mobility taxi service in Atlanta,” Garrow said.The city of Atlanta’s transportation plan notes that autonomous vehicles can change the way people get around but does not address the prospect of drone transportation in particular.Last year, Georgia Tech engineering professor John-Paul Clarke testified at a U.S. House committee hearing on the subject “Urban Air Mobility—Are flying cars ready for takeoff?” He called urban air mobility a “logical response to the perennial quest for speed in congested urban areas,” but noted the challenges that lie ahead, including concerns about noise, privacy and safety.The technology has not yet developed to the point where local officials are making any plans for vertiports, since flying passenger drones are still unproven and years away from becoming a reality in everyday life.But the Georgia Department of Transportation says it is “actively engaged with the industry” looking at emerging transportation technology, according to GDOT’s intermodal division director Carol Comer.German said he expects commercial service of the new electric aircraft in five to 10 years or so, possibly starting with flights from small general aviation airports.”Some people think the aircraft will (first) be flown by human pilots. Other people think it will be autonomous from the beginning,” German said. “If it’s a piloted aircraft operating from existing airports and existing heliports, the operation will look a lot like ordinary aviation.”The first customers might be business travelers transferring to a commercial airport for a flight, or between corporate sites in a metro area, since the cost of service will be high to start, he said. Then, as costs come down, a greater variety of people might use the service.Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport general manager John Selden, a former airline pilot, sees potential in the idea that autonomous pods that run along a rail might someday be able to transport people between the domestic terminal and international terminal.But to make pilotless passenger planes a reality, “You would have to overcome a whole lot,” Selden said.Among the biggest challenges would be getting regulatory approval from the Federal Aviation Administration and developing vertiports.Aside from the safety of the aircraft themselves, flying passenger drones would add even more complexity to air traffic control. “If this increases the number of flight operations in a city by a large amount, then the old mechanisms we have won’t be adequate anymore,” German said.In considering where the aircraft would take off and land, Uber Elevate sees parking decks in downtown areas as a potential location for “skyports.” If ride-sharing and, eventually, self-driving cars reduce the need for parking in downtowns, then parking decks might be used less and the upper levels could be converted into vertiports. Building rooftops, already a common spot for heliports, might also be used as vertiports.While some private operators might want to develop their own vertiports and control them, with limited space available in city centers, that could affect how much competition develops. Airports, for example, are typically run by local governments or local or state government authorities, but can involve public investment.”I think cities are going to have a lot of say and questions related to land use, whether they would allow a vertiport or not, questions like noise ordinances, what would be the flight paths over a city,” German said.The biggest demand for urban air mobility, or UAM, would likely come from the cities with the worst congestion, Garrow said—making Los Angeles a preferred city for the first wave of service. Other cities near bodies of water where commuters have to drive over bridges to get to work, causing traffic pinch points, could also be good candidates, she said.”One promising aspect for Atlanta is we’re not as built up around the suburbs as some other cities are,” allowing more room for vertiports, German said. “We want to see it here, and we want to have Atlanta as kind of a living laboratory for urban air mobility,” with test corridors.Debra Lam, managing director of Smart Cities and Inclusive Innovation at Georgia Tech, said she sees urban air mobility as one of the “tools to get from point A to point B” that could tie into the airport, public transit, an e-scooter or an Uber car ride.A key question: Will people be willing to fly in the aircraft? And will residents of cities be comfortable with the noise and with passenger-carrying drones buzzing overhead?Some note that helicopters already generate a backlash from residents, causing many heliports to go unused. In San Francisco, there’s even a website called Stop The Helipad where residents organize to block helipads.During a panel discussion on barriers to urban air mobility at the Aviation Week conference, HMMH Aviation Services vice president Gene Reindel said: “To some people it’s a fear of the aircraft coming down, crashing on them. … Now we’re talking about putting these (low-flying) UAMs over urban areas where there are people.”With new technology, “you will have some public failures,” Lam said.”Even once this goes forward there are still going to be challenges. There will be a crash at some point,” she said.”I don’t think that should necessarily preclude it from continuing,” she said. “There should be room for some of those challenges.” Citation: Could drones be the solution to traffic gridlock? (2019, May 27) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-drones-solution-traffic-gridlock.html NASA, Uber to explore safety, efficiency of future urban airspace Credit: CC0 Public Domain Explore further ©2019 The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, Ga.) Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Perak exco member denies graft accusations claims mastermind behind attacks

0 Comment

first_img Perak , Perak exco , Abdul Yunus Jamhari Tags / Keywords: IPOH: Perak executive council member Abdul Yunus Jamhari believes that the person who lodged a police report against him on Saturday (July 13) was directed by a “mastermind” to destroy his political career.The state Public Amenities, Infrastructure, Agriculture and Plantation Committee chairman said there had been many attempts to discredit him since the party elections last year.”It is because of my support for party deputy president Datuk Seri Mohamed Azmin Ali,” he said.In a statement on Saturday, Abdul Yunus also claimed there were also attempts to get him dropped as a state exco member and to sabotage the Perak Mentri Besar’s leadership as the state exco swearing-in ceremony was approaching. Nation 10 Jul 2019 Perak exco member being probed for rape Related News Metro News 29 Jun 2019 Exco: Not easy to convert agricultural land for housingcenter_img {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Nation 27 May 2019 Aziz Bari prepared to be dropped as exco member Related News “I believe Parit Buntar PKR committee member Beh Yong Kean, who lodged the report, is being used.”I strongly deny the malicious allegations made against me,” he added.It was earlier reported that Beh had accused Abdul Yunus of soliciting kickbacks over a land matter.Abdul Yunus said he would lodge a report at the Bagan Serai police station on Sunday at 10am.”I will lodge a report on the allegations and the fake police report made against me,” he added.Related story:PKR man accuses Perak exco member of soliciting commission, lodges reportlast_img read more

Tags: , , , ,