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SourceMedia Launches New Digital Platform

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first_imgSourceMedia, publisher of B2B brands American Banker, The Bond Buyer, Financial Planning, and Health Data Management, among several others, announced today a company-wide relaunch of its digital publishing platform in an effort to optimize engagement, cross-platform user experience, and native advertising integration. Health Data Management, Employee Benefit News, and Employee Benefit Adviser are the first brands to receive the digital makeover; flagship American Banker, along with the rest of SourceMedia’s more than 20 titles, will follow in the near future. One of those innovative ways is through native advertising, which the company indicates is a key aspect of the new launch. Sponsor-commissioned articles, white papers, infographics, and videos will be integrated into content feeds without confusing readers, according to SourceMedia. The shift to center a company’s growth strategy around digital growth and innovative marketing solutions—even as SourceMedia still publishes a number of print magazines—is a clear trend in B2B media as print advertising revenues run dry and intimate audience relationships grow ever-more valuable. Moreover, mobile responsiveness is vital to any brand, with audiences increasingly accessing digital content via smartphones. Reston, VA-based Perfect Sense Digital developed the new content management system, which will power an expanded content taxonomy designed to bring accurate, relevant content to the surface. Brooklyn-based digital agency Work & Co. designed the new user experience. Roadblocks remain, though, perhaps the most notable of which are ad blocking and viewability. SourceMedia hopes the new, cleaner site design, as well as more seamless integration of native advertising, will help overcome those challenges. “As a premium B2B network, technology is at the center of our strategy,” said Minna Rhee, SourceMedia chief digital and marketing officer, in a statement. “We are actively developing our internal capabilities and evolving with new technologies that will drive ongoing improvements to deliver more engaging user experiences while providing marketers with more innovative ways to reach their target audiences.” With features like a cleaner interface, responsive design, and continuous scrolling, the company hopes the new platform will better harness the business opportunities afforded by digital media and allow its audiences and clients to more deeply engage with one another. “This is a milestone for SourceMedia, enabling us to deliver on important operational priorities and product strategies,” added David Longobardi, chief content officer, in a statement.last_img read more

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Stranger Things 3 hid an obscure Easter egg but someone finally found

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first_img2:33 Share your voice What makes this reference so special is that Stranger Things star Winona Ryder (Joyce Byers) also starred in the comedic Tim Burton ghost movie Beetlejuice.   There is a bit of a time discrepancy here. Stranger Things season 3 is set in 1985, but Beetlejuice came out in 1988. Does that mean Mr. Clarke is a time traveler? That would be quite a twist. Now playing: Watch this: See all the Stranger Things season 3 photos Tags While the writers didn’t want to give any hints, they at least told us what it wasn’t. That list included Back to the Future, Jaws, Wonder Woman, posters, songs, Nancy Drew, shirts, Radio Shack, Mall Rats, Terminator, Evil Dead and Alien. They did confirm it was a pop culture movie reference.You can continue the search on your own if you think you have what it takes, or you can check out the answer, which was finally delivered by Twitter user Hackyzach. Hackyzach correctly identified the Easter egg as Beetlejuice’s tombstone, which was tucked into the town model created by science teacher Mr. Clarke. “Winner, winner, banana boat for dinner,” the writers declared. As for the prize, Hackyzach tweeted it would involve signed Stranger Things merch. Stranger Things season 3: Everything to know More Strange things TV and Movies Originally published July 8, 11:38 a.m. PT. Update, 12:41 p.m. PT: Adds correct answer and the tweet identifying it.  it’s monday and we want to play a game: there’s a particular easter egg in episode 2 of s3 that you haven’t found, first person to crack it gets a prize. go! pic.twitter.com/0wfQOmNmtV— Stranger Writers (@strangerwriters) July 8, 2019 59 Photos 5 Stranger Things returned for its third season in July 2019. Netflix Stranger Things is stuffed full of ’80s pop culture references of everything from Magnum P.I. to Star Wars, but fans overlooked at least one major Easter egg. The writers room for the supernatural Netflix hit has its own Twitter account, and it teased the heck out of us mere days after the show returned for season 3. “It’s Monday and we want to play a game,” the writers said. “There’s a particular Easter egg in episode 2 of S3 that you haven’t found, first person to crack it gets a prize. Go!” The show’s fans got busy playing the guessing game, but struck out over and over. “Y’all can get it without a hint. Come on, don’t let me down,” the writers tweeted, which just made the quest all the more maddening. Comments winner, winner, banana boat for dinner https://t.co/Thw55kfS1L— Stranger Writers (@strangerwriters) July 8, 2019 Stranger Things season 3: Our biggest WTF questions 15 TV shows to watch once you’re done with season 3 Netflixlast_img read more

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Selfpowered ewatch is powered completely by wrist movements

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first_img Explore further (Phys.org)—Researchers have created a self-powered electronic watch that harvests energy from the wearer’s wrist movements for continuous operation. By combining two different energy conversion mechanisms (electromagnetic and triboelectric) in a single hybrid nanogenerator, the device can harvest significantly more energy than previous harvesters that use only a single mechanism. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play Rapid wrist movements can charge a capacitor connected to the watch (which is not ticking in the beginning of the video) to 1.6 V, after which the watch begins ticking. Credit: Quan, et al. ©2015 American Chemical Society The researchers experimented with the way that different wrist movements can charge and power the watch. They found that the best wrist movement is a twisting motion that can generate a current of up to 12 mA, which means that thirty-nine seconds of this twisting motion can power the watch continuously for about 7.5 minutes. By adding a homemade Li-ion battery to store the energy produced by the hybridized nanogenerator, the researchers found that 32 minutes of the twisting motion can generate enough energy to continuously power the watch for more than 3.5 hours. Based on this data, the researchers calculated that 3.6 hours of wrist movement can generate enough energy to power the watch for one day of continuous operation.Since the current prototype is rather large in size, the researchers attempted to reduce the dimensions by replacing the magnetic ball with a thin magnetic sheet. However, they found that the magnetic sheet does not move as easily as the ball, and so in the future they plan to investigate other methods of miniaturizing the nanogenerator. They also hope to eliminate the need for the battery.”The future plan is to solve the power source issue of the wearable electronic device, so that these devices can work sustainably without being charged by the external power source,” Yang said. “Ideally, the motion of human-body-induced energy will be enough to power these devices.” Citation: Self-powered e-watch is powered completely by wrist movements (2015, November 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-11-self-powered-e-watch-powered-wrist-movements.html Journal information: ACS Nanocenter_img More information: Ting Quan, et al. “Hybridized Electromagnetic–Triboelectric Nanogenerator for a Self-Powered Electronic Watch.” ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b05598 (Top) The hybridized nanogenerator contains a magnetic ball inside an acrylic box with six coils on the sides of the box. The watch strap is made of nylon and PDMS-PVB nanowires, connected to copper electrodes. (Bottom) Photos of the nanogenerator and twisting wrist movements. Credit: Quan, et al. ©2015 American Chemical Society The scientists, led by Ya Yang at the Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems in China, and Zhong Lin Wang at the Georgia Institute of Technology in the US, have published a paper on the hybrid nanogenerator in a recent issue of ACS Nano.”This kind of nanogenerator can also be utilized to power other wearable electronic devices, such as a wireless smart pedometer for reading data on walking steps, distance, and energy consumption,” Yang told Phys.org.The hybrid nanogenerator consists of a small box (3.6 cm x 3.6 cm x 3 cm) with a magnetic ball inside. When the wearer moves their wrist, the ball’s motion generates electricity by both the electromagnetic and triboelectric effects. Due to the electromagnetic effect, when the ball collides with six metal coils on the sides of the box, the ball’s mechanical energy is converted into electricity. The triboelectric effect occurs when two materials are rubbed together, similar to how rubbing a balloon on a person’s hair creates static electricity. Here, the watch strap serves as the triboelectric component. The strap is made of two materials with different triboelectric polarities, nylon and a polymer composite, which are attached to the bottom of the box and to two electrodes. When the moving magnetic ball presses down on the watch strap, the nylon and polymer come in contact with each other, generating triboelectric charges and causing electrons to flow between the electrodes. United States, China team explore energy harvesting © 2015 Phys.orglast_img read more

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