Young Indonesian men today less uncomfortable around higher-earning women: Economist

first_imgIndonesian men in their 30s are beginning to feel more comfortable with women earning more than them, an economist has said.Aviliani of the Institute for Development of Economics and Finance (INDEF) told a discussion on Dec. 18 that, contrary to widely held assumptions, many of today’s women are not doubtful about their competence when given an opportunity for higher income and/or responsibility.“What they are not confident about is the spouse and family support” as men, particularly of the older generation, still lack confidence when their wives earn more. Dossy said that, while tagging along Bluebird director Noni Poernomo and having to “take over” her responsibilities for a day, she noticed Noni’s energy and communication skills in managing the taxi company from early morning to evening before meeting her children. Such energy and skills, Dossy said, looked essential not only in a male-dominated company but also in navigating the family-owned business. Though it looked very tiring, Dossy said, it also motivated her to progress in her career.A study published last July in the Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies revealed that women’s workforce participation remained stagnant at around 51 percent from 1996 to 2013.A 2014 report from the World Bank showed that only 9 percent of top managers at private firms in Indonesia were women, though more women are filling management positions, other surveys show.Read also: In ASEAN, gender equality still very much a ‘tick-the-box’ issueOn Dec. 18, three IBCWE members were presented certificates for gender equality: Lifestyle retailer PT Mitra Adiperkasa, tire maker PT Gajah Tunggal, both publicly listed, and textile and garment manufacturer PT Dan Liris.The certificate, called Economic Dividends for Gender Equality (EDGE), is based on a global assessment methodology and business certification standard for gender equality. The standards include equal pay for equal work and gender balance in junior level recruitment to top management.Gajah Tunggal director Catharina Widjaja told The Jakarta Post she was motivated to have the company strive for gender equality so that men and women “could complement each other” in the male-dominated business. Though highly challenging, the male staff were “curious”, she said, in the firm’s subsequent efforts to promote and recruit women amid the stereotype that women are largely uninterested in science and manufacturing.“Some of the men have daughters, and they also hoped their girls could get more opportunities” to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, Catharina said.Women participates in the international women’s day 2020 in Sarinah, Central Jakarta, on Sunday 8 March 2020. The community demands gender equality rights on international women’s day, and rejects Omnibus Law. (JP/Donny Fernando)While some of the female staff declined promotions over fears of struggling to juggle career and family, Catharina said support from the IBCWE was crucial to help management continue to show support for working mothers. Among other things, the firm has a breastfeeding room and daycare center.Meanwhile company leaders Erik Meijer of Telkomtelstra and Suresh Subramanian of Kantar Indonesia said they had found that investing in more encouragement for women was “good for business”. Diversity brought new ideas, Subramanian said.Meijer said that, contrary to the widespread perception that women often asked for leave to tend to family matters, his female staff were very hesitant to ask for such permission compared to the men. Other speakers at the event included participants of role plays staged in businesses called “Women take over: Leading in a day”, facilitated by the IBCWE, in which female staff members tagged along female leaders and acted as their bosses for a day.Meida Kurniawati, a staff member at publicly listed garment manufacturer PT Pan Brothers, and Dossy Irani, a marketing sponsorship staff member at taxi operator PT Bluebird, also said women’s doubts about seeking income and developing a career stemmed mainly from family and society rather than their own ability or lack thereof.Meida said she found that being emotional, considered a weakness of women, could be turned into a strength.She cited study results showing high emotional intelligence as a preferred leadership trait. “Being emotional can be positive, not just being angry”, Meida said, referring to the stigma of temperamental female bosses. Women’s strengths included the willingness to share and show empathy, she said.Read also: More than a woman in business: Shinta Kamdani talks leadership in economy Men born after 1990 were more likely than older men to regard women as equals, Aviliani said.The 1974 Marriage Law legalizes the traditional view that men are breadwinners, as it states, “the husband is the head of the household and the wife is a housewife”.Read also: ‘Feminism is not for Indonesia’: Conservative Muslims’ recipe for women’s empowermentAviliani was addressing the third anniversary of the Indonesian Business Coalition for Women Empowerment (IBCWE), which has 20 corporate members. Topics :last_img read more

Tests for all? French doctor defies government on virus

first_imgAnxious patients wearing masks form a line zig-zagging back several streets outside a hospital in the French Mediterranean port city Marseille. Young and old all keep strictly one meter apart and an eerie silence hangs in the air, punctuated only by indignant shouts as some try to skip the queue.Hundreds got up at the crack of dawn to get in line to be screened for coronavirus in a France where normally tests are reserved for health care workers or people most at risk. The French health system is currently carrying out 5,000 tests every day but officials admit this is nowhere near enough to catch every case, meaning the real number infected could be much higher than the published data. Step in prominent but controversial French doctor Didier Raoult, head of the department specialising in infectious diseases in La Timone hospital in Marseille.He announced with five professors and doctors on Sunday that anyone feeling feverish or simply anxious could ask to be tested at the clinic. Student Louise Serrano has a temperature, a headache and a cough and has come for the screening with her father.  “My uncle is sick and my mother too, we prefer to get tested so we can protect them. They are more at risk of dying than us,” the 20-year-old said.Should be at homeBy 7:00 am, Gilbert Salomone was waiting in line with his wife and daughter for the clinic to open two hours later.The 49-year-old only has light symptoms and admits that he’s not particularly worried. “It’s mostly to find out whether we have it or not, to set our minds at rest,” he said. “For the test, it’s very quick, a swab in the nose and it’s over. We will be contacted within 48 hours if we are declared positive,” he added. Like Salomone, most people in the queue do not appear to have severe symptoms but an elderly man suddenly collapses.People around him attempt to carry him up the steps of the hospital, before healthcare workers come out with a wheelchair and take him inside. “Raoult is crazy, all these people should be at home!” said a doctor leaving the hospital after a long overnight shift. Showing up at a hospital just to take a coronavirus test flies in the face of official French policy which is to stay at home in isolation if a person fears having the disease and to only go to hospital in case of breathing difficulties.But attached to the railing outside a banner reads: “We support Professor Raoult” and the doctor is by no means a newcomer to controversy. Fake news?For weeks now, the eccentric scientist with shoulder-length blond hair and a grey beard has been advocating the use of chloroquine — long used as a treatment for malaria — as a cure for coronavirus. Raoult, 68, is a member of the expert committee advising the French government on the coronavirus.He reported that after treating 24 patients for six days with hydroxychloroquine, the virus disappeared in all but a quarter of them. He also believes it is essential to trust the results obtained in China by leading pulmonary disease expert Zhong Nanshan, whose tests appear to confirm the efficiency of the drug. US president Donald Trump has also advocated the use of chloroquine. But the research has not yet been peer reviewed or published, and Raoult has come under fire from scientists and government officials alike. His critics have pointed to problems with the protocol and worrying side effects of the drug. Fakemed, a group of scientists against fake news in health, has lambasted the professor. “A video accusing me of fake news has been viewed 450,000 times on Facebook,” said Raoult. “But it’s good publicity, they can carry on saying such awful things,” he added. The mayor of Nice, Christian Estrosi, has said he is being treated with chloroquine after being diagnosed with the virus and he publicly defended Raoult.Waiting in line for her turn, 20-year-old Talia Abad said she would be open to trying the medicine. “People close to me work in the healthcare sector and they trust the treatment. And because I trust them, I’m willing to experiment,” she said. A clinical trial to test four treatments for coronavirus, including chloroquine, was launched on Sunday in seven European countries. The study is to be conducted on 3,200 patients. Topics :last_img read more

Despite pandemic disruptions, UN carries on — by videoconference

first_imgOpen but empty Despite stay-at-home measures and orders closing schools, museums and theaters in New York, the UN headquarters remains open.But it was emptied of its huge workforce in mid-March when most began working from home.Before the pandemic, more than 11,000 people would enter the United Nations on a typical day. Now, no more than 140 do, according to UN figures.Guterres initially came in every day to work at his office. Now, he wears a mask and this month began splitting his time between the office and his residence, a house with a garden on the East River. The usually buttoned-down world of the United Nations is having an unruly April as it copes with the global coronavirus pandemic in a city that is suffering terribly from it.The UN Security Council’s president is stuck in the Caribbean. Closed-door meetings of ambassadors have been upheaved by news leaks. Video conferences have been disrupted by unintended guest appearances.So far, the UN appears to have been largely spared the epidemic raging in New York, the epicenter of the disease in the United States. Topics : Transparent meetings Although they are normally quick to denounce news leaks of their conversations, Security Council ambassadors surprised journalists with how porous their first session on the COVID-19 pandemic became.No sooner had the “strictly closed door” meeting begun Thursday than one country’s mission posted a screen shot of the participants on Twitter.Others followed with excerpts of speeches, some going so far as to email Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ speech to AFP before the session had ended.”There is more transparency behind closed doors,” quipped one UN official. Intimate video conferences The diplomats have taken to videoconferences with abandon.”We see poorly; the sound isn’t terrible,” but “it forces us to be brief,” said one ambassador. “We do WhatsApp and videos. It’s a pain,” but “it gets the job done.”The UN diplomats also have multiplied the use of Zoom to conduct informal briefings.These too can be revealing. Diplomats have shown up on screen in their bedrooms. In one case, a diplomat mistakenly replaced himself on screen with a giant image of his wife.center_img Few in its 3,000-member workforce have tested positive for the disease, perhaps because it implemented working-from-home measures earlier than the rest of the city.To keep working in such exceptional circumstances, however, calls for exceptional measures — and, like most other organizations, the UN has experienced a few hiccups along the way.  The presidency of the 15-country Security Council rotates each month in alphabetical order. After China in March, it has been the turn of the Dominican Republic in April.But Dominican ambassador Jose Singer is in Santo Domingo, stranded due to border closures.Thanks to videoconferencing he has been able to conduct discussions — but, according to one ambassador, endured some teasing when he showed up one day wearing his “local outfit.”  Security Council in paradiselast_img read more

Proposal could see Champions League final on Aug. 29: BBC

first_imgTopics : European soccer’s governing body (UEFA) is working on a proposal that could see the remainder of the Champions League condensed into a week-long mini-tournament with the final taking place on Aug. 29 in Istanbul, the BBC has reported.Football, as with most sports around the world, has been brought to a standstill by the COVID-19 pandemic, with all major European leagues suspended and the Champions League stalled in the middle of its round of 16.UEFA wants the Europa League final to be held in Gdansk on Aug. 26 and the Champions League final played three days later, the report said. UEFA is considering two options, one of which is to hold the Champions League quarter-finals and semi-finals across two legs in July and August. This would only be possible if domestic leagues restarted in June.The second option is to play the remaining Champions League ties as one-off fixtures after the end of the domestic seasons and could see the remainder of the competition played out over the course of a week.Both options would be discussed at UEFA’s Executive Committee meeting next Thursday, the report added.The Champions League final was originally scheduled to take place in Istanbul on May 30 and the Europa League final was due to be held in Gdansk three days earlier.last_img read more

Jet fuel consumption drops as airlines reduce, halt operations due to COVID-19

first_imgJet fuel consumption in Indonesia has slumped as a result of nosediving air travel because of the COVID-19 pandemic.Data from state-owned oil company Pertamina show that the average daily consumption of aviation fuel during the period of March 1 to April 14 was down 45 percent from the January-February period. In March alone, daily average consumption of aviation fuel plunged 60 percent compared to the previous month.“This is staggering. A 60 percent decline in avtur consumption was caused by suspensions in most domestic and international flights,” said Pertamina president director Nicke Widyawati on Wednesday. With the sharp drop in sales, Pertamina’s stock of jet fuel would be enough for the next 119 days, said Nicke, prompting the company to consider exporting avtur.The Indonesian National Air Carriers Association (INACA) previously reported that national airlines had slashed flights, frequency by 50 percent or more, as airlines continued to see steep drops in passenger numbers due to the pandemic, which has forced several countries to impose travel bans. Low-cost carrier AirAsia Indonesia has temporarily halted all of its flight services since April 1.The number of air passengers has declined accordingly. There were only 5.79 million domestic passengers in February, down by 8.08 percent from January, Statistics Indonesia data show.The number of international flight passengers, meanwhile, plummeted to 1.1 million people in February, which is down more than 33 percent from January.Topics :last_img read more

Eiffel Tower caps ‘HeroesShineBright’ tribute

first_imgThe Eiffel Tower joined other global landmarks Saturday in capping a sparkling tribute launched by the Empire State Building in New York to those battling the coronavirus.At 8:00 pm (1800 GMT), when people in France have been clapping daily from windows and balconies to thank health-care workers, the Paris landmark lit up in “sparkling white” to hail “the unfailing courage of care workers confronting the coronavirus pandemic,” said SETE, the company that manages the Eiffel Tower.A half hour later, the lights on the 20th century Montparnasse Tower, another tall landmark in the French capital, transitioned from white to red “to show its support even more intensively, like a beating heart,” the company added. Read also: Google Doodle pays tribute to frontline workers amid pandemicThe nine-day #HeroesShineBright initiative started on April 24 in New York and each night a different color is used there to salute various groups including health care staff, transit workers and police or military personnel, SETE added.  Other landmarks that have supported the initiative are the Euromast in Rotterdam, 360 Chicago, the UAE’S Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest structure, the CN Tower in Toronto, the Macao tower in China, the Busan Tower in South Korea, the Ostankino TV Tower in Russia, the Tallinn TV Tower in Estonia and the OVNI Tower in Slovakia.Topics :last_img read more

Garuda Indonesia furloughs contract workers to stay afloat amid pandemic

first_imgDuring the three-month period, the furloughed employees will still get their health insurance and Idul Fitri bonus, Irfan stated.The COVID-19 outbreak has forced Garuda to park 100 of its 142 aircraft while its number of daily flights has declined 70 percent compared to normal days as people stay at home to avoid contracting and spreading the virus. In the first quarter of 2020, the airline recorded a 31.9 percent annual drop in passenger and cargo revenue. Previously, Garuda Indonesia took several measures to maintain its cash flow amid the plummeting demand for air travel caused by the outbreak. The measures include cutting employees’ and executives’ salaries, cutting production costs for efficiency and renegotiating obligations to partners and aircraft lessors.The airline also opened discussions with holders of its US$498.9 million in sukuk due on June 3 as the company struggles to pay its dues.Aviation observer Gerry Soejatman estimated recently that national airlines would continue to reduce their capacity and services in the next several months to avoid bankruptcy, especially as recovery in passenger demand would take a long time.“In the meantime, airlines need to be very careful in maintaining their cash flow to survive until the passenger demand returns to normal,” he said.Topics : National flag carrier Garuda Indonesia has decided to furlough around 800 contract workers for three months starting May 14 as the airline struggles to stay afloat amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Garuda Indonesia president director Irfan Setiaputra said the measure was a hard decision that needed to be made to help ensure the airline’s sustainability before it resumed normal operations. “We have made this decision after thorough consideration by taking into account the employees and the company’s interests and to avoid layoffs,” he said in a statement on Sunday, adding that the decision had been discussed between the employer and the affected employees. last_img read more

McDonald’s slapped with sexual harassment lawsuit at OECD

first_img“Because McDonald’s has neglected to act to create a safe workplace, the Dutch government should make use of this complaint to empower workers to effectively address the rampant harassment they face under the Golden Arches,” she said.The lawsuit also targets two investment banks, APG Asset Management of the Netherlands and Norges Bank of Norway, which together have holdings worth $1.7 billion in the food giant.The plaintiffs noted that the OECD’s own guidelines “require due diligence by institutional shareholders in companies to ensure responsible business conduct.”The unions said the suit was the “first-ever complaint brought to the OECD to take aim at systematic sexual harassment at a multinational company.” An international group of labor unions said Monday it has filed a lawsuit against McDonald’s for “systemic sexual harassment” at the fast food chain’s restaurants around the world.The suit, filed at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)’s offices in the Netherlands, was the first of its kind to target a multinational company, the plaintiffs said.”McDonald’s workers have sounded the alarm about sexual harassment and gender-based violence for years, but a company with a culture rotten from the top has failed to take meaningful action to address the problem,” said Sue Longley, general secretary of the International Union of Foodworkers, in a statement. Topics :center_img The legal action cites witness testimony of “attempted rape, indecent exposure, groping, and sexual offers.” It said the victims, some as young as 16, “said they were ignored, mocked, or punished when they reported it. Some had their hours cut back and others were fired.”It also cited cases of “groping, touching, forced kissing and other forms of unwanted bodily contact” in branches of the food chain in numerous countries including the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, France, and others.In France, it cited a case in which a McDonald’s manager allegedly “installed a cellphone camera in the women’s changing room, and secretly filmed young women changing their clothes.””Gender-based violence and harassment is part of McDonald’s culture,” the complaint alleged.The suit will be examined by the Dutch government, which has up to three months to decide whether to launch a process of mediation with the company.The unions, which include the European Federation of Food, Agriculture and Tourism Trade Unions and the Service Employees International Union of the United States and Canada, said they brought the case in the Netherlands because in the United States, where the company is headquartered, McDonald’s “insists it has no responsibility for employment conditions, employment relations, or workplace abuses in the more than 90 percent of its stores operated by franchisees.”The unions chose the Netherlands because it is the “nerve center” of the fast food giant’s European operations, and also the headquarters of APG bank last_img read more

Hary Tanoe’s 19-year-old son steps in to buy Jokowi’s Rp 2.55 billion motorcycle

first_imgNineteen-year-old Warren Tanoesoedibjo, son of business tycoon Hary Tanoesoedibjo, was named the winner of an electric motorcycle owned and signed by President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo after he agreed to match the winning bid of Rp 2.55 billion (US$178,037).Warren had been the second-highest bidder in the auction, which was held during a virtual charity concert on May 17.The initial winner, a Jambi construction worker named M. Nuh, failed to pay for the motorcycle, saying he was unaware that he was participating in an auction. “He thought he had won [the motorcycle] as a gift at the charity event,” Jambi Police chief Insp. Gen. Firman Santyabudi said on Thursday.The virtual charity concert organizer, Olivia Zalianty, then contacted Warren to see if he still wanted to buy the motorcycle.“It turned out he was only 19 years old and said he really wanted to buy the motorcycle with the President’s signature,” Olivia said in a press conference on Friday. “And he was prepared to buy it for the same price as the winning bid.”Hary, who represented Warren at the press conference, said his son had asked his permission to take part in the auction.“He asked my permission to use his savings for the charity auction. I told him to go ahead if he wished to do so,” Hary said.Topics :last_img read more

Muslims in Jakarta rejoice as mosques open for Friday prayers

first_img“Earlier, [I participated in] Friday prayer in the Bangka Raya area of [South] Jakarta. My temperature was checked when I entered the mosque and I was given a plastic bag to carry my footwear,” another Twitter user @naavyyk posted on Friday.Tadi sholat jumat di wilayah Bangka Raya Jakarta, masuk halaman masjid dicek suhu dan diberi kantong plastik buat bungkus alas kaki pic.twitter.com/mQTYSxvh59— navy’ fanani (@naavyyk) June 5, 2020President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo also performed the prayer in the Baiturrahim mosque situated in the presidential palace complex.Kompas.com also reported that Governor Anies Baswedan performed Friday prayer in the Fatahillah mosque located in the City Hall compound.Read also: Jakarta takes risk of rebound by moving to ‘transitional’ restrictionsSome mosques in the city such as Al Azhar Mosque in South Jakarta were also packed with congregations, among them was former Vice President Jusuf Kalla who is also the chairman of the Indonesian Mosque Council (DMI), as reported by Tempo.co.To prevent overcrowding in mosques during the weekly prayer, the Indonesian Ulema Council (MUI) had issued a fatwa allowing the prayer to be conducted in turns in two groups, rather than the usual simultaneous prayer at noon.Besides mosques, the Jakarta Administration has also allowed other houses of worship to operate during the transition phase.The Jakarta archdiocese, for example, had been gearing up to open its churches by preparing a new worship protocol following the Religious Affairs Ministers’ announcement that houses of worship would be gradually reopened.“We are making sure that our parishes are ready to follow the worship protocol,” Jakarta archdiocese secretary Adi Prajoso said in a letter issued on Wednesday.“When the new protocol and our parishes are ready, we will gradually open the church.”Topics : “Alhamdulillah [thank God], I can perform Friday prayers again. I feel very happy,” Denny told The Jakarta Post on Friday.“I hope that we can continue holding Friday prayers in mosques and that the PSBB will be over soon.”Many Jakartans have also shared their experience participating in Friday prayers with the additional physical distancing measure and health protocols trough social media.“Alhamdulillah, this afternoon I performed Friday prayer in congregation at the Masjid Raya Al-Azhar in Sentra Primer, East Jakarta. It was conducted with health protocol to prevent COVID-19 [transmission], such as maintaining physical distance, temperature checking, and requirement to wear a face mask,” Twitter user @azzam_satriawan posted on Friday.Alhamdullilah, tadi siang saya baru saja melaksanakan ibadah Sholat Jumat secara berjamaah di Masjid Raya Al-Azhar, Sentra Primer, Jakarta Timur. Dilakukan protokol kesehatan untuk mencegah Covid-19 seperti menjaga jarak, pengecekan suhu dan wajib memakai masker saat Sholat. pic.twitter.com/QTb6e1nFjP— Muhammad Azzam Satriawan (@azzam_satriawan) June 5, 2020 After months of praying at home, Muslims in Jakarta are now able to perform the first Friday prayers in mosques on Friday following the transitional period in the capital city that starts to ease restrictions in public spaces in the capital city.Denny Faizal, a 22-year-old university graduate, joined the Friday prayer, a weekly congregational prayer mandatory for Muslim men, in Teladan Mosque in Tebet, South Jakarta. It was his first Friday prayer in a mosque after only performing it at home since mid-March, weeks before the official implementation of the large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) in April amid the social distancing measures taken to curb the spread of COVID-19.He said the mosque followed the protocols mandated by the city administration, namely body temperature check before entering the premise, assigning the 1-meter distance policy between participants and requiring them to wear a face mask. The congregations must also bring their own prayer mats and a bag to store their footwear. In addition, the sermons given before the prayer was quicker compared to normal times, he said.last_img read more