The miracle that is the bear

first_img Reply Wonderful. Thank you for sharing. January 23, 2021 at 6:12 pm January 23, 2021 at 6:07 pm January 17, 2021 at 9:43 am You are so right! Love love LOVE this picture and article. God has given us so many gifts. If this is what the view from a bear is like, can you imagine God’s vision and perspective ? AMAZING. Gives you something to think about, right? Have a blessed day my dear friend and keep writing….. January 23, 2021 at 3:17 pm January 18, 2021 at 8:42 pm TAGSBEAR!Charles TowneFaithGodInspirationNatureSenses Previous articleMLK: Protest with resolve, and without violenceNext articleThe Benefits of Using the Kratom Products Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR NH January 17, 2021 at 3:30 pm Faith & InspirationBy Charles TowneI closed my eyes for a few moments, must have dozed off.  When I opened my eyes, a 200-pound female bear was standing in the creek about 15 feet from me. She just stood there gazing off into the swamp with her back towards me.  It is a wonderful thing to be accepted by the bears, yes; accepted and at times ignored.  She left as quietly as she came. Any sound she makes is far below my ability to hear.Such an incredible creature is my friend the bear. EdG, Ahh; dear friend, One thing we can do is not live just for the moment. Delay instant gratification. Another is, value all life. it is a frustrating situation when man doesn’t value his own life! If he doesn’t see the value of his own life enough to treat it as the temple that it is, how can he see the worth of those “others” man and animal All life is sacred, perverted by generations of sin? Perhaps, but sacred none the less. A man said, “Every creature is better alive than dead, men, moose, and pine trees, and he who understands it aright will rather preserve its life than destroy it.” More to come! Chaz Reply January 17, 2021 at 7:54 am January 17, 2021 at 6:07 pm Dear Judith, A heart can’t be touched unless that heart is open! Bless you my dear sister, Your big brother, Chaz January 24, 2021 at 4:03 pm charles towne Charles Towne is first and foremost a Christian. An octogenarian, author, journalist, wildlife photographer, naturalist, caregiver, and survivor, his life has been and continues to be, a never-ending adventure filled with possibilities never imagined. He has adopted the philosophy that to Live fully, laugh uproariously, love passionately, and learn like there is no tomorrow, is a formula for a long and joy-filled life. EdG, You are so right in your wise conclusion, but I feel it calls for more than coexisting in the way man interprets it. We, man, has proven that we cannot coexist even with our own kind. Let us become better than we are, more kind, more gentle, more compassionate! What do I mean by that? I can sum my conclusion up n one word, and that word is Christlike. Chaz charles towne Please enter your name here charles towne Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter January 19, 2021 at 8:13 pm What an amazing story! We take so much for granted and don’t even notice blessings God gives us daily! It is truly incredible how God has woven everything together. I pray we start thanking Him and get ourselves in tune with the big picture He has planned for us.God bless you! charles towne charles towne Reply Impressive story Charles, and Precious & Stunning Bear’s Pic !!! You’re Right !!!Incredible GOD gave us flora & fauna and many many gifts that we can’t appreciate all days … All creatures and plants with particularities turn this World UniQue !!!MUST Save our Planet !!! Love U, Little Bro Charles Towne Reply Reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here love that! Thank you!!! Reply Photo by Marc-Olivier Jodoin on Unsplash Faith Fowler January 17, 2021 at 6:12 pm Reply January 21, 2021 at 8:58 am You said, “I feel it calls for more than coexisting in the way man interprets it.” Summing it up, you said, “I can sum my conclusion up n one word, and that word is Christlike.” What practical, “Christlike”, things can we/I do to preserve our wildlife and their habitat? Please, be specific. charles towne January 18, 2021 at 1:44 pm January 17, 2021 at 8:46 am Leo, yes my friend, I really appreciate the photo. Chaz Dear Cindy Hudson, It is people like you that make it all worthwhile! Bless you and yours, Chaz Mike McFadden 22 COMMENTS Leo CSG January 17, 2021 at 4:20 pm January 17, 2021 at 9:15 am Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Charles, I really love your bear story. Praise God for all of His creative acts including animals and especially mankind. Continue to post your stories!!! Reply January 19, 2021 at 9:27 am Great story as usual. I now see why you so appreciate that picture – it is so detailed. Keep the stories coming and stay warm. Reply Reply Reply Reply Reply charles towne January 23, 2021 at 3:03 pm Reply There is little that the bear misses. Her hearing is as keen as our own. And despite the belief that a bear’s eyesight is poor, we now know that she is blessed with exemplary sight and able to discern color. But where she really excels is in her marvelous sense of smell. To give you a little idea of just how wonderful her sense of smell is let me illustrate with a story.   One day a pine needle fell to the forest floor. An eagle, flying high in the sky, saw the pine needle fall, for there is not much that escapes the wonderful sight of the eagle.  A rabbit, out for a stroll, heard the pine needle fall, for there is little that fails to reach the ears of the rabbit.    But, way over there on the other side of the forest, a grandfather bear was dozing when the pine needle fell. He lazily opened his eyes, sniffed, and said to his wife, “Hmm, a pine needle just fell on the other side of the forest.”  His wife said, “Yes dear, and did you smell the pine needle fall on the little baby mouse that was napping on the forest floor?” Just imagine, if our merciful God gave these wonderful senses to the wild creatures,how much more has He provided for you and me?  “Papa God, we thank you for your great love and mercy that you have blessed all of your creation. I wonder, could it possibly be that the greatest gift we can bless our children with is a great love, not just for others like us, but for all living creatures? Let us instill in the young a sense of awe, wonder, and respect for all life, for if we can show concern for even the smallest moth then surely we will respect one another even more. Praise you O’ Holy friend, praise you.  Amen.” Reply Thanks for making the world a better place by continually reminding us of Christ’s love. Reply January 22, 2021 at 8:19 pm Jimmie L Waller January 17, 2021 at 9:21 am I loved the bear story. It teaches me that God loves all of His creation especially you and me. We are fearfully and wondrously made….praise God and thank you Charles. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 As we continue to impose on the homes of local wild by our aggressive building projects it is wise to learn as much as possible about them. Hopefully we’ll learn how to better coexist and preserve what is a gift from God. The Anatomy of Fear Hello CharlesThe first thing when we hear of bears, fear fills our senses and the need for caution. But in this case, the bear was minding her own business and not intimidating at all. No need to raise “High Alert”. I think this too is because one needs to have peace to know when peace is present. Praise Papa God for giving you peace, by so doing, HE allowed you to experience the beauty of creation in a non-threatening way. All Glory to God!!!Mignon Mike, you are so right! The detail in the photo is remarkable, but more than that there is an innate intelligence reflected in the eyes that indicates an intelligence that is quite extra ordinary. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could sit down next to a campfire at night and converse with the family of Ursa? Perhaps someday we will be given that great gift. I wonder if that wasn’t God’s original intent? One of us lost the gift of communication and I am not sure that it was bear? Bless you and yours my friend, chaz Jimmie Waller charles towne Cindy Hudson Dear NH, I believe there is something divine in all of God’s creatures, from the most insignificant to the most spectacular, and somewhere in that mix is man. Only our God can give you that gift of vision and perspective you speak of. O Holy God, open our eyes that we may se, open our hearts that we may love, Amen and Amen. Reply Mignon, you present a very good point. Fear begets fear; with man as well as animals. It is my experience that man presents a much greater danger than does man. Thanks s much for your observation dear friend. Bless you, Chaz January 17, 2021 at 6:01 pm EdG Dear CSG, you and NH have both hit the nail on the head this morning with the depth of your comments. What a wonderful God we serve! Chaz Jimmie, can you imagine the relationship Our Lord has with all of His creation? Blessings on you folks for eternity, Chaz Reply Reply EdG Reply Judith Hankes January 21, 2021 at 8:08 am Reply Please enter your comment! charles Mignon Waller Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Strong levels of support reported for N Ireland charities

first_img Howard Lake | 9 September 2016 | News Strong levels of support reported for N Ireland charities  12 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis5 90% of people in Northern Ireland supported a charity in the last six months and trust levels of charities, at 79%, are high, according to new research by the Charity Commission for Northern Ireland (CCNI).The most important factors in public trust of charities were identified as how funds are raised and funds being used properly. 92% of respondents in the research said transparency was important in relation to fundraising.Over the last two years trust in charities has decreased by 26% of the respondents, while 6% reported an increase in trust. Media coverage about how charities spend the donations they receive was the major factor in shaping peoples’ views of charities.The research, which was based on four focus groups and a MORI poll of over 1,000 people in February this year, found there was concern about ‘aggressive’ fundraising tactics and face-to-face fundraising. 66% said some of the fundraising methods used by charities make them uncomfortable.‘My mother is in her 80s and she is tortured by charities,’ one focus group member said.When people were asked what influenced them to support a charity they listed four factors:‘localness’their own potential to use the charity’s servicespersonal experiences of the charity, andthe feel-good factor in giving.The main way respondents said they supported charities was through donations, either by giving to a street collector, donating goods to a charity shop or in response to an appeal.  11 total views,  1 views today Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis5last_img read more

Radio Era Baru forcibly closed by police

first_img to go further Organisation Help by sharing this information November 19, 2020 Find out more News September 13, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Radio Era Baru forcibly closed by police August 12, 2020 Find out more News Red alert for green journalism – 10 environmental reporters killed in five years Follow the news on Indonesia President Susilo Bambang YudhoyonoMr. Patrialis AkbarMinister of Law and Human RightsParis, 7 September 2011Subject: Request to quash Gatot Machali’s sentenceDear President Yudhoyono,Dear Minister Akbar,Reporters Without Borders, an international organization that defends media freedom, would like to draw your attention to the disproportionate sentence that was passed yesterday on Radio Era Baru manager Gatot Machali.Concluding a prosecution that began in March, a panel of three judges in Batam (in Riau province) sentenced Mr. Machali to six months in prison, a suspended sentence of another year in prison and a fine of 50 million rupees (5,800 US dollars) on charges of broadcasting without permission and disrupting neighbouring frequencies. Mr. Machali has said he intends to appeal.There are many reasons for thinking that Radio Era Baru and its manager were in fact prosecuted for political reasons.Firstly, the Indonesian authorities have refused to grant the station a licence since 2007. It was forbidden to broadcast by the Ministry of Communication and Information Technology’s frequency monitoring centre in Batam (Balai Monitor Frekuensi) on 28 March 2008, although it had complied with all technical requirements, including those specified by the Riau province branch of the Indonesian Broadcasting Commission (KPID), which gave the station permission to broadcast at the time of its launch.Secondly, the problems that Radio Era Baru has been encountering since 2007 seem to be a result of the nature of some of the programmes it broadcasts. It often denounces human rights violations in China, including violations of the rights of Uyghurs, Tibetans and members of the banned religious movement Falun Gong.According to the station’s president, Raymond Tan, citing the leaked copy of a letter from the Chinese embassy in Indonesia, the prosecution is the result of direct pressure by the Chinese government on the Indonesian authorities with the aim of preventing the station from broadcasting its programmes.For these reasons, we deplore the harsh sentence imposed on Mr. Machali. It violates Indonesia’s laws and Constitution, which says in articles 28-E-3 and 28-F that each person has the right to freely “express his opinions” and to “spread information via all kinds of channels available.” We therefore call on you to:• Quash the Mr. Machali’s conviction, which is disproportionate and contrary to the fundamental principles and rights of freedom of expression.• Authorize Radio Era Baru to resume broadcasting under the same conditions that prevailed at the time of its launch in 2005.• Adopt measures to ensure that no external political pressure can be put on the Indonesian media.We thank you in advance for the attention you give to these requests.Sincerely,Jean-François JulliardSecretary-General Receive email alertscenter_img August 21, 2020 Find out more Melanesia: Facebook algorithms censor article about press freedom in West Papua News Reporters Without Borders condemns today’s forcible closure of Radio Era Baru by police and frequency monitoring officials although last week’s conviction of its manager on a charge of broadcasting without permission and disrupting neighbouring frequencies is still the subject of an appeal.The closure of the station, located in Batam (in Riau province), was carried by at least 30 officials including members of the military police and local police and representatives of the Communication and Information Ministry (Kominfo/Dirjen Postel), the Frequency Monitoring Agency (Balmon) and the Riau branch of the Indonesian Broadcasting Committee (KPID Kepri).They arrived at Radio Era Baru at around 11 a.m., forced the padlock on the door of the transmitting room and, despite the protests of the journalists present, removed transmitting equipment, thereby preventing the station from continuing to broadcast.Manager Gatot Machali explained to the police that last week’s ruling by a Batam court was not final because an appeal has been filed, but they paid no attention.Reporters Without Borders calls on the local authorities to respect the judicial proceedings still under way, and reiterates its appeal to the government to protect freedom of the media and information in Indonesia. IndonesiaAsia – Pacific RSF_en On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia ——————–9. september 2011 – Six months in jail for radio station manager who covered rights violations in ChinaReporters Without Borders strongly condemns the sentence of six months in prison and the suspended sentence of another year in prison that a court in the city of Batam passed yesterday on Gatot Machali, the manager of Batam-based Radio Era Baru, on a charge of broadcasting without permission and disrupting neighbouring frequencies.Another three months will be added to Machali’s jail sentence if he is unable to pay the fine of 50 million rupees (5,800 US dollars) which the court also imposed. Reporters Without Borders wrote today to President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and Minister of Law and Human Rights Patrialis Akbar asking them to intercede on behalf of Machali, whose conviction is believed to be the result of Chinese government pressure over the station’s broadcasts in Chinese about human rights violations in China: IndonesiaAsia – Pacific Newslast_img read more

Live ammunition cartridges found in pile of rubbish in West Donegal

first_imgAudioHomepage BannerNews Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic By News Highland – November 16, 2020 Facebook Facebook Twitter WhatsApp Twitter Google+ Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Previous articleCrucial week for Brexit as talks resumeNext article14 more Covid deaths and 331 cases in NI News Highland center_img Live ammunition cartridges have been discovered dumped among rubbish in West Donegal.The cartridges were found in a pile of illegal dumping at Muckish Railway walk this morning.The discovery has been reported to Gardai.Local Councillor John Sheamais Ó Fearraigh says serious harm could have been caused if the cartridges were picked up by someone who was unaware of the dangers of them:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/ofearraigh5pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Live ammunition cartridges found in pile of rubbish in West Donegal RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Pinterest Google+ Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens furtherlast_img read more

Climate change in the Kola Peninsula, Arctic Russia, during the last 50 years from meteorological observations

first_imgThe authors provide a detailed climatology and evaluation of recent climate change in the Kola Peninsula, Arctic Russia, a region influenced by both the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. The analysis is based on 50 years of monthly surface air temperature (SAT), precipitation (PPN), and sea level pressure (SLP) data from 10 meteorological stations for 1966–2015. Regional mean annual SAT is ~0°C: the moderating effect of the ocean is such that coastal (inland) stations have a positive (negative) value. Examined mean annual PPN totals rise from ~430 mm in the northeast of the region to ~600 mm in the west. Annual SAT in the Kola Peninsula has increased by 2.3° ± 1.0°C over the past 50 years. Seasonally, statistically significant warming has taken place in spring and fall, although the largest trend has occurred in winter. Although there has been no significant change in annual PPN, spring has become significantly wetter and fall drier. The former is associated with the only significant seasonal SLP trend (decrease). A positive winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index is generally associated with a warmer and wetter Kola Peninsula whereas a positive Siberian high (SH) index has the opposite impact. The relationship between both the NAO and SH and the SAT is broadly coherent across the region whereas their relationship with PPN varies markedly, although none of the relationships is temporally invariant. Reduced sea ice in the Barents and White Seas and associated circulation changes are likely to be the principal drivers behind the observed changes.last_img read more

Dixie State Meets Chadron State To Continue in RMAC Play Saturday

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCHADRON, Neb.-Saturday, Dixie State football seeks its second winning season in the past three campaigns as they head to the plains of western Nebraska to battle the Chadron State Eagles.Saturday’s tilt at Chadron, Neb. is the third all-time meeting between the Trailblazers and Eagles with Dixie State leading the all-time series 2-0.Dixie State comes in to this one at 5-2 and 5-1 in Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference play while the Eagles are 4-2 overall as well as in RMAC play.The Trailblazers also come in to this one with 28 sacks, making them the RMAC leaders in this statistic.Against Western State last Saturday, defensive back Trayvon Watson and defensive lineman Wes Moeai had two sacks apiece to flummox the Mountaineers.Dixie State star tailback Sei-J Lauago is only 254 yards short of all-time school leading rusher DeJon Coleman’s record as he has 1,468 career yards and Coleman stands at 1,721 yards, having competed for the Trailblazers in 2015 and 2016.The Eagles pose a significant challenge to the Dixie State defense offensively as signal-caller Dalton Holst completes 58.3 percent of his passes (107-183) on the season for 1,436 yards, 13 touchdowns and only three interceptions.Holst has several solid receivers to throw to, including Jackson Dickerson (27 rec, 291 yards, 2 TD’s), Brandon Fullerton (21 rec, 346 yards, 3 TD’s) and Cole Thurness (20 rec, 282 yards, 4 TD’s).The Eagles’ standout tailback is Kevin Coy Jr. (104 car, 497 yards, nine TD’s). This plethora of talent enables Chadron State to score 38.2 points per game.The Chadron State defense struggles as they surrender 30.7 points and 440.3 yards per game. The Eagles’ leader defensively is linebacker Tyler Lewis who has 63 tackles and three sacks on the season. October 19, 2018 /Sports News – Local Dixie State Meets Chadron State To Continue in RMAC Play Saturday Tags: Brandon Fullerton/Chadron State/Cole Thurness/Dalton Holst/DeJon Coleman/Dixie State Football/Jackson Dickerson/Kevin Coy Jr./RMAC/Sei-J Lauago/Trayvon Watson/Wes Moeai Brad Jameslast_img read more

Showcase success

first_imgSet in the beautiful and also slightly quirky town of Glastonbury, Burns the Bread has pride of place on the high street, set among shops selling crystals and books on fairies and witchcraft. Yet unlike its neighbours, the bakery has its head firmly in the real world and a honed approach to its business and customers.From charitable showcase evenings, booking accommodation for rain-soaked campers, to pulling customers’ trousers up (I’ll get to this a bit later), partner Terri Petherbridge says the firm goes “above and beyond the call of duty”. Its focus on providing “something more than the customer expects” saw it take away the Customer Focus Award, sponsored by CSM UK (formerly BakeMark UK) at the Baking Industry Awards 2009, last September.The business was established back in 1983, when Robert Burns took over a “pretty run-down” bakery in Glastonbury high street after the previous owners retired. “We ran that one shop for around 10 years,” says senior partner Burns. “Then we opened the shop in Street around 15 years ago, and the Castle Cary shop just over a year ago.”We’ve not been dynamic in wanting to expand, it has been an organic growth,” says Burns. “We’ve never gone out looking for business. All the wholesale business we’ve got has come to us.”The family firm currently has three generations working for it, and is no stranger to the Baking Industry Awards, having entered three years running and in no less than three categories in 2009. Robert Burns was a finalist in the Baker of the Year category, and Petherbridge’s son, Max Stoddart, made it to the last three for Trainee Baker of the Year. “We had won the Customer Service Award 10 years ago, and we hadn’t entered the category since then, so we wanted to ensure we were still at the same standard,” explains Petherbridge.The judges wanted to find out what initiatives the business had that were different in some way. Burns the Bread highlighted its charity bakery visits as its point of difference, and something that is beneficial to all involved. Between October and April, the firm hosts these showcase evenings, once every two weeks on average, in aid of St Margaret’s Hospice. The visit lasts around two-and-a-half hours and brings in groups of around 20 people from far and wide, ranging from the WI, to Boy Scouts and Rotary Clubs. “They come in and have a glass of wine, and we do a Burns the Bread Generation Game. They have a tour of the bakery, and then we make pasties four each which we judge and give prizes for the best; these are vouchers they can use at the bakery. Then we have a buffet and more wine,” says Petherbridge. The business doesn’t charge for the evenings, but asks that people give a donation, normally around £10, which goes to the local hospice. “They take home around £10-worth of goods a loaf of bread, a cake and the pasties they made and they get the buffet as well.”She says she stated on the application form that the showcase evenings are a win-win-win situation: the bakery is spreading the word about its products and its business; the visitors get a nice evening out and a goodie bag; and the charity receives a regular donation.Burns says the company has been running the evenings for over 10 years, but more so in the last five, and has raised thousands of pounds for St Margaret’s. The groups tend to come from a 25-mile radius of the bakery, but there has been a group from Canada and one from New Zealand.Petherbridge adds that one of the amazing things is that the company has never advertised the evenings; all the participants have come through word of mouth, and the bakery already has visits booked in for next year. The judges described its showcase evenings as a well-thought-out, long-term project, which was all about the customer.Another aspect of the business highlighted to the judges was the fact that the company carries out customer surveys once a year, asking for feedback and ideas about products customers would like to see. “And we act on them if we get a number of requests and we realise that it’s something in demand,” says Petherbridge.Moreover, when it comes to being attentive to customers needs’, Petherbridge says she has even helped a lady with a broken arm to pull her trousers up, as they were falling down and she couldn’t pull them up herself. And she has even been known to book accommodation for customers who had been camping when the weather turned bad and were in need of a dry bed for the night.In the year leading up to the award, Burns the Bread achieved Investors in People status, as well as picking up several other awards, including Best West Country Baker, and Best Trainee West Country Baker, won by Stoddart, at the Western Bakery Championships. It even donated its total prize money of around £800 to charity.Training is another area that is very important to Burns the Bread. “We have just put six of our staff through NVQ Level 2 retail, and another six are starting now. A few are also doing NVQ Level 3,” explains Petherbridge. “Training is ongoing. It doesn’t stop when you finish one thing, you learn something new all the time.” She explains that although it is good to recruit someone with the basics, “we have our own ways and methods and we like to train the staff ourselves”. The company also recruits its staff based on personality, as she says you can teach them the skills, but it’s important to have the right character for the job. She says staff retention is high and, interestingly, there are only two employees at the bakery who haven’t been trained there.Positive staff responsePetherbridge notes that the staff’s response to the Customer Focus win has been understandably positive. The bakery manager and his wife and the Glastonbury shop manageress attended the awards, along with Burns, Petherbridge and Stoddart. And she could hardly believe it when the firm was announced as the winner, she says. “I was just ecstatic. It was so nice because my son was there as well, as he was up for an award. One of the girls on our table won one of the big bottles of champagne and gave it to me, so I brought it back and shared it with the girls in the shop.”The firm put posters about its awards win in the shop window and had coverage in the local paper. The actual award is currently residing in the window of the Castle Cary shop.For those bakery companies thinking of entering the Customer Focus Award in BIA 2010, Petherbridge says they need to focus on an area where they are better than their competitors. Ours is a long-term initiative and something that has tangible results. “Just go for it. It’s definitely a confidence boost for the business and confirmation that you’re doing something right.”We try to make our products special, so that they are beyond comparison a totally different product and the customer service we offer is the best it can be,” she says. “The customer is king and they have to come first. If you go the extra mile to give them something more than they expect, and than everyone else gives, then that’s great.” What the sponsor had to say “Burns the Bread held regular bakery evenings, which introduced people to the art and techniques of baking. Their entry submission for this award included numerous customer feedback sheets, included photos and was a long-term project, encouraging many people to try their hand at baking. This was a selfless initiative to develop relationships with all sorts of local groups, with no financial benefit. It was truly customer-focused” John Lindsay, UK country manager and business unit director, CSM (UK) On winning the award “It’s good for local people to know we’re recognised by a national award. And it makes the staff feel good to know that their hard work has paid off” Terri Petherbridge Vital statistics Number of employees: 50Turnover: approximately £1.5mRetail/wholesale split: 75/25Speciality products: Its secret recipe Glastonbury pasty and the Torsy Moorsy a rich fruit cake made with sultanas, pecans, local Cheddar cheese and Somerset cider, which is sold in a gift tin. The recipe has been adapted from an old recipe found by the family when they were renovating the bakery over 25 years ago.Top sellers: Glastonbury pasty the pasty room makes around 1,000 a day. Its muffins and flapjacks sell well, as do its Chocolate Devils, which have a fudge-like texture and contain fruit, nuts and biscuit.last_img read more

News story: Immigration Rules: Next phase of EU Settlement Scheme confirmed

first_imgThe Rules also introduce the new form of immigration leave for children transferred to the UK during the Calais camp clearance to reunite with family here, as announced in September 2018. Calais Leave will grant those who qualify the right to study, work, access public funds and healthcare, and apply for settlement after 10 years.The changes also include bringing forward a new application service for visas. The new service builds on UKVI’s digital application platform and will transfer all data, such as supporting evidence and biometric information, to UKVI digitally. This is a significant step towards UKVI’s ambition to become more digital and user friendly.As announced in May 2018, the new front-end service will be operated by Sopra Steria and will begin to be rolled out from next month.The UK Visa and Citizenship Application Services centres will be available across the country, with six core centres in Manchester, Birmingham, Glasgow, Cardiff, Belfast and Croydon as well as a premium lounge in London. These will be supported by an additional 50 enhanced service points providing coverage across the UK.There will also be additional services which include being able to upload your evidence from home or arranging a mobile service to come to your business, university or home.The Rules are also being amended to specify the evidence for medical exemption from Knowledge of Language and/or Life in the UK requirements. The changes include specifying the medical professionals who can support a request for exemption and the format in which this request must be made.These changes will come into force on 1 November 2018.Further information on the EU Settlement Scheme can be found on GOV.UK. As this Government has consistently made clear, EU citizens make a huge contribution to our economy and to our society and we want them to stay. The EU Settlement Scheme will make it simple and straightforward for EU citizens to get the status they need but it is important that we get this right. I am pleased with how the first phase of the scheme has progressed, especially that those who have applied have found the process easy to use. The next phase of the roll-out of the EU Settlement Scheme, which allows resident EU citizens and their family members to obtain their UK immigration status, has been confirmed in the Immigration Rules.This follows the successful first private pilot, involving 12 NHS Trusts and 3 universities in the North West of England, which had very positive feedback from customers on the ease of the application process.The second phase will run from 1 November to 21 December 2018 and will test the full online application process. The number of participating organisations will increase significantly, with staff in the higher education, health and social care sectors across the UK included in this phase.Vulnerable people with additional support needs are also going to be included in this phase, with the involvement of a small number of local authorities and community organisations.This second test phase will help to make sure that the EU Settlement Scheme will operate as effectively as possible when it is fully open.Immigration Minister Caroline Nokes said:last_img read more

Watch Turkuaz Cover ‘The Shape I’m In’ For Funky Rhode Island Rager [Full Show Video]

first_imgLast weekend, Brooklyn-based funk army Turkuaz strutted their stuff at The Spot in Providence, RI for quite the tasty performance. The band has been taking no prisoners, following their funky 2015 release Digitonium with some exciting tours and concerts nationwide.Thanks to master videographer MKDevo, we have full show footage from last Friday’s performance, complete with so many Turkuaz classics and a soulful cover of The Band’s “The Shape I’m In” as a concluding encore. Tune in below:Setlist: Turkuaz at The Spot, Providence, RI – 2/26/16Set One: Intro, Percy Thrills (The Moondog), Nightswimming, Murder Face, Babies Makin’ Babies, M’Lady, The Mountain, Let It Ride, Tiptoe Through The Crypto, Snap Your Fingers, Bubba Slide, Coast to CoastSet Two: 20 Dollar Bill, Barking Up The Wrong Tree, Chatte Lunatique, Future 86, European Festivity Nightmare, Digital Love, The Generator, Everyone’s a Winner, Gogo Mister Dodo, The Rules, Lookin’ Tough, Feelin’ GoodEncore: The Shape I’m Inlast_img read more

When picky eating is too great a luxury

first_imgPoor families, like families everywhere, share an age-old parental challenge: getting kids to eat healthy.But recent research by Caitlin Daniel, a doctoral candidate in sociology in Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, shows that low-income parents face a critical burden other parents don’t: They can’t afford the waste that goes hand in hand with getting kids to eat their Brussels sprouts.The research, backed by a Harvard catalyst childhood obesity pilot grant and published in the journal Social Science and Medicine, provides new understanding of one of the forces driving the American obesity crisis. Daniel spoke to the Gazette about the costs of eating well. GAZETTE: Your research sheds light on some of the economic roots of the obesity epidemic as it affects low-income families: food waste and picky kids. Can you describe your work for us?DANIEL: The paper comes from a broader project on the food decisions of parents across the socioeconomic spectrum. It comes at a time when concern about diet-related disease is on the rise. The particular goal of this project is to understand the interplay between economic constraints on the one hand and the ideas that people hold about food on the other. This interest is largely borne of my own personal experience growing up in a lower-income household, where economic constraints were definitely part of food decisions. But I also noticed that social and symbolic aspects of eating were nonetheless present.This interplay between the social and symbolic and economic wasn’t reflected as much as I wanted in public health research on food choices among the poor. It wasn’t reflected in sociological and anthropological research on food and eating either. And my sense was that if we want to understand the socioeconomic disparities in diet quality and diet-related health, we really need to understand the resources people have to procure food, as well as the place food holds in their life in a symbolic and social sense.GAZETTE: Specifically, what did you do?DANIEL: Three summers ago, I started interviewing parents in the Boston area about how they decide what to feed their families: their priorities, their concerns, their challenges, some of their attitudes toward food and eating and health. Then I followed a subset of them — about half of them — on a typical grocery-shopping trip. I had already done the interviews at this time and they knew I was following them — just to see what they did, how they made decisions — and then I sat down with them after the shopping trip to probe some of their thoughts as they were going along.GAZETTE: So how many families did you shop with?DANIEL: I’ve actually done additional shopping trips since the paper was published. At that point, I’d followed 38 people on shopping trips and had done two trips with a small handful of people. And I had talked to 73 parents.Based on her research, Caitlin Daniel found that “the food-desert argument … is predicated on the idea that we go to the closest place that’s available.” Credit: Creative CommonsGAZETTE: So you spent a lot of time in grocery stores. Was there a particular grocery store that people favored?DANIEL: It varied depending on where people lived. A lot of the Cambridge-Somerville people went to Market Basket in Somerville, especially the low-income people. I found this pattern interesting. The food-desert argument — which is very compelling and many people are familiar with — is predicated on the idea that we go to the closest place that’s available. People often lived closer to a different store but would make a monthly, longer trip to Market Basket because the prices were so much lower. The low-income people in Dorchester and Roxbury would go to a place called Save-A-Lot or to a place called PriceRite. And, similarly, these were not always the closest options but the amount that people saved outweighed the inconvenience and time involved in making that trek.GAZETTE: So that’s an indication of the importance of cost to people’s food choices?DANIEL: Yes. Store selection says a lot about the role of economic resources in food provisioning. Absolutely.GAZETTE: Your work focused, of course, on getting kids to eat healthy. Could you talk a little bit about those findings?DANIEL: Very early on, it became clear to me that lower-income respondents minimized the risk of food waste by purchasing what their children like. And often children like food that is calorie-dense and nutrient-poor.It can take children some eight to 15 times to accept the food that they didn’t like at first. Vegetables, for example, are a little bit harder to love than macaroni and cheese, and it can take repeated experience to come to like something like mustard greens or Brussels sprouts. The low-income parents were quite attuned to this possibility of waste because their budgets were often so tight that they couldn’t take an economic hit in the form of food their children wouldn’t eat.I also talked to higher-income parents. They were less on edge about food waste and more inclined to repeatedly introduce their kids to foods they didn’t like at first or to take a risk on something when they didn’t even know if the child would like it.GAZETTE: Does this affect not just the kids’ diet but also the diet of the rest of the family?DANIEL: In some cases, parents ate what they were going to eat anyway and gave something separate to the child. But in some cases parents didn’t want to go through the process of cooking two separate meals. [They] would cook something the child found acceptable and so that would apply to everyone else. For example, I talked to a woman who had recently adopted teenage boys. She loved collard greens and she made collard greens, [but] they wouldn’t eat them. After a while she said, “You know what? No one here is eating collard greens anymore because these boys won’t eat them and we’re going to make something that they’ll accept instead.” So there does seem to be a spillover effect of children’s taste on what the rest of the family eats.GAZETTE: What to your mind is the most striking thing about this study?DANIEL: To me the most important point … is that children’s propensity to reject new foods has implications for how we calculate the cost of a healthy diet.There’s some degree of debate about whether low-income people can actually afford healthy food. On the one hand, people say it’s just too cost-prohibitive to afford a healthy diet on a budget. On the other hand, some people say that with adequate planning and budgeting, lower-income people can actually eat quite a wholesome and healthful diet.But usually the researchers and food-justice advocates who address this question don’t account for waste. For poor parents, waste is very salient and when they assess whether something is affordable or expensive, they don’t just look at the number on the price tag, they also think about whether the food will actually get eaten. In some cases, when the food goes uneaten, something that’s affordable on paper becomes expensive in practice. Currently, ways of measuring food costs don’t account for the cost of waste.You could argue that for adults it’s their responsibility to manage waste: If they buy something and don’t eat it, that’s on them. But in the case of children, waste is a normal and even an inevitable part of eating and taste acquisition. Without accounting for that waste, assertions that low-income households can afford a healthy diet actually overestimate a family’s ability to provide their children with a wholesome diet.GAZETTE: Did any solutions become apparent? Were there low-income families that were successful maintaining or transitioning to a healthier diet?DANIEL: I’ll touch on two points. One is that parents’ tendency to make safe choices isn’t uniform across families. And [two], parents’ tastes — or the tastes of other people living in the household — are also part of this picture.When parents or other family members like a wide range of foods, they can offer the child small portions of what they’re already eating or absorb the waste that the child creates. I did talk to economically constrained families where the parents loved a wide range of healthy foods and they were less concerned about their children rejecting that salad because they would eat what the child left behind. But often low-income parents I talked to had both limited finances and limited palates. And it’s these parents who faced the greatest risk of waste, because if neither the parent nor the child liked the food it would go to waste entirely.GAZETTE: Is parents’ retraining their own palates no small task, when they’re rushing to get off to work and trying to get the kids out the door?DANIEL: There’s the time cost, there’s the cognitive bandwidth — that people often don’t have — to cultivate new habits, and the waste argument applies to parents retraining their palates as well. Parents may need multiple times trying something new before they like it, and waste may be generated in that process, too. So I think that fundamentally this is an issue of economic inequality. We can’t expect people to experiment and take risks on things when their budgets don’t have the latitude to be eroded in that way.How we address economic inequality is a complicated and political question. There are a number of shorter-term policy and programming interventions that could be done. I noticed that low-income parents were quite willing to purchase things that their children had tried outside the home and liked. In these cases, children would say they had tried something at school, say Asian pears or pomegranates, or they had tried something at a friend’s house, like asparagus, and the parent, knowing that the child would eat those things, would express a willingness to purchase them. So if the risk of food waste can be shared across institutions that children are involved in, that’s a way of relieving that burden from families themselves.last_img read more