Brew leaving Dragons for Biarritz

first_img Brew was part of the Wales squad at the World Cup in New ZealandNewport Gwent Dragons can confirm that wing Aled Brew is set to leave the region at the end of the season for Biarritz.The 24-year old wing has enjoyed 2 stints at the Dragons, with international call-ups resulting from both his periods at Rodney Parade.‘I’m looking forward to moving abroad but I also leave the Dragons with a heavy heart,” he said. “I had opportunities to join other teams in Wales and England but had no interest in playing for any other team in the UK. The Dragons have given me the opportunity to play Regional Rugby, they have helped me achieve my ambition of playing International Rugby and made me the player that I am today.Following his fantastic form for the Dragons last season, Aled was part of Gatland’s squad for the World Cup but felt frustrated after being left out of this season’s Six Nations campaign. “Not being chosen for the Welsh 6 Nations squad has played a part in my decision to move abroad but I also feel that experience in a different league will make me a better player.”Brew has been a fan’s favourite at Rodney Parade and a key part of the regional side, picking up his 100th appearance this weekend. “Aled has been a great servant to the Dragons and he will be missed by the players, coaches and supporters alike. We are confident as a region that we are developing quality players and the likes of Matthew Pewtner and Lewis Robling, not to mention Hallam Amos and Jack Dixon show that there is a strong future Dragons rugby.”There will be no further comment from Aled or the Dragons regarding his future team at this stage. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “The Dragons couldn’t have done any more to keep me in Wales, they made me a fantastic offer to stay but I just feel the time is right for me and my young family to experience a new culture, way of life and also a new rugby experience. I would like to thank the Dragons board, Management team, players and especially the fantastic supporters for everything that they have done for me and I wish the team every success for the future.”Dragons’ Director of Rugby Robert Beale said “We understand Aled’s desire to take on a new challenge abroad. Players have relatively short careers and these decisions are often about much more than just rugby. NEWPORT, WALES – FEBRUARY 06: Aled Brew of Newport Gwent Dragons during the LV Anglo Welsh Cup match between Newport Gwent Dragons and Scarlets at Rodney Parade on February 06, 2011 in Newport, Wales. (Photo by Tom Dulat/Getty Images)last_img read more

Summer Tours: South Africa v England Preview for Match One

first_imgReplacements 16 Luke Cowan-Dickie, 17 Joe Marler, 18 Harry Williams, 19 Brad Shields, 20 Nathan Hughes, 21 Ben Spencer, 22 Piers Francis, 23 Denny Solomona.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS All you need to know about the Test between South Africa and England in Johannesburg South Africa v England PreviewTwo giants of the global game come together with plenty at stake. In only the second three-match series between the sides – South Africa won 2-0, with one draw, in 2012 – the Springboks are starting afresh under new coach Rassie Erasmus following the sacking of Allister Coetzee in February.Erasmus’s opening match last weekend brought defeat by Wales in a dismal match in Washington, but he has a completely revamped side this time, with only tighthead Wilco Louw possibly starting again should Trevor Nyakane fail a fitness test.Nevertheless, big guns such as Eben Etzebeth, Malcolm Marx and Warren Whiteley are missing and Eddie Jones’s more experienced XV arguably start as slight favourites, despite the fact England have only beaten the Boks three times on South African soil.England will certainly be eager to end a four-match losing run, comprising Six Nations defeats by Scotland, France and Ireland, and a high-scoring reverse to the Barbarians in an uncapped match at the end of May.Chris Robshaw missed six tackles in that Baa-Baas match and scrutiny will fall on the senior players just as much as the rookies as Jones searches for the combinations that he hopes will take England to glory at next year’s World Cup.Nice touch: Ben Youngs scores on England’s previous visit to Ellis Park in 2012, a match the Boks won 36-27What’s the big team news?Lots to digest. The switching of Mike Brown and Elliot Daly, with Daly getting a run at full-back and Brown restored to the wing shirt that he last wore with regularity in 2013, has raised eyebrows. Brown is more of a weaving runner than a traditional flyer, but whatever the number on his back he will be a reassuring back-three presence under the high ball.Tom Curry, a debutant in Argentina last summer, finally gets another go at seven after an injury-plagued season while Kiwi-born Brad Shields is set to win a first cap off the bench after jetting in from Super Rugby.Curry is the only non-London club forward to start, with Saracens’ hefty contingent including two-cap lock Nick Isiekwe – Joe Launchbury has a calf injury – and No 8 Billy Vunipola for his first cap since Dublin last year. Vunipola’s book Wrecking Ball last night won the Rugby Book of the Year prize at the Sports Book Awards in London.Welcome return: Tom Curry gets a chance at seven after missing much of the season with injury (Getty)Another Saracen, scrum-half Ben Spencer, can expect to win a first cap as a replacement in a side led by Owen Farrell because regular captain Dylan Hartley is resting after concussion.South Africa give debuts to wings S’busiso Nkosi (Sharks) and Aphiwe Dyantyi (Lions), as well as Bulls lock RG Snyman.Willie le Roux and Faf de Klerk are included after outstanding Premiership seasons with Wasps and Sale respectively, and there’s a new captain in Siya Kolisi. Prop Tendai Mtawarira will win his 99th cap almost ten years to the day since his Test debut v Wales in Pretoria.Attacking threat: Willie le Roux’s last cap came against Italy in Florence in Novemver 2016 (Getty)What have the coaches said?South Africa coach Rassie Erasmus: “It will be one proper series, a hell of a series. We lost the game with Wales (last weekend), which makes it two defeats in a row and Eddie (Jones) and England have lost four in a row. We are all under pressure and, when you lose for your country, the heat comes on you.“It will be a step up we’re ready for. We have to win and so do they. When you get matches like that it means the first game at Ellis Park is going to be a massive one.“Eddie is a wonderful coach. He always has a lot of plans, and the things he does in the build-up to a Test match in terms of what he says are always very smart. I don’t think it will be any different this time and it’s going to be a wonderful occasion.”England coach Eddie Jones: “We’ve had a really good week in preparation and are pleased with the way the squad has come together.center_img “Owen Farrell has settled in well to his new role, with the senior players supporting him, and there is a good feeling within the camp. We want to do something special on this tour and the players are incredibly excited about this challenge and opportunity we have.“Ellis Park is the spiritual homeland of South African rugby and the Springboks play to another level on that ground, so we know we have to raise our game physically early on and be enormously accurate in the way we play.”Boks boss: Rassie Erasmus with Pieter-Steph du Toit and new skipper Siya Kolisi (AFP/Getty)Any interesting statistics?* This will be England’s fourth meeting with the Springboks at Ellis Park (currently called Emirates Airline Park). They won there 18-9 in 1972 but lost 35-9 in 1984 and 36-27 in 2012.* Ben Youngs scored two tries in that defeat six years ago. He and Chris Robshaw are the only starters this weekend who also started in 2012, but Owen Farrell and Joe Marler were also involved on that occasion.* England’s back division has three times as much Test experience, with the average caps per man being 44 compared to South Africa’s 15. The caps tallies in the pack and on the bench are almost identical.* This is England’s eighth tour to South Africa. Excluding the one-off Test in 1972, they have yet to win a series there, although they drew 1-1 in 1994 and 2000.* The average South Africa-England score in South Africa is 28-16 while across all 38 meetings it’s 21-17.* The Springboks’ 58-10 win at Bloemfontein in 2007 is England’s second-biggest Test defeat ever, eclipsed only by the 76-0 rout by Australia on the 1998 Tour to Hell. Mike Brown, on the wing this weekend, made his Test debut in that Bloemfontein match.Switch: Elliot Daly, being tackled by Denny Solomona in training, gets a run at 15 this weekend (Getty)What time does it kick off and is it on TV?The match at Ellis Park kicks off at 4.05pm UK time on Saturday and is live on Sky Sports. There will also be live commentary on BBC Radio 5 live and online.The referee is New Zealander Ben O’Keeffe, who took charge of England’s 30-6 win over Australia last autumn that had Michael Cheika complaining about TMO decisions. The assistant referees are France’s Romain Poite and New Zealand’s Glen Jackson, with Ireland’s Simon McDowell fulfilling TMO duties.What are the line-ups?SOUTH AFRICA Willie le Roux; S’busiso Nkosi, Lukhanyo Am, Damian de Allende, Aphiwe Dyantyi; Handré Pollard, Faf de Klerk; Tendai Mtawarira, Bongi Mbonambi, Trevor Nyakane/Wilco Louw, RG Snyman, Franco Mostert, Siya Kolisi (capt), Jean-Luc du Preez, Duane Vermeulen.Replacements 16 Akker van der Merwe, 17 Steven Kitshoff, 18 Wilco Louw/Thomas du Toit, 19 Pieter-Steph du Toit, 20 Sikhumbuzo Notshe, 21 Ivan van Zyl, 22 Elton Jantjies, 23 Warrick Gelant.ENGLAND Elliot Daly; Jonny May, Henry Slade, Owen Farrell (capt), Mike Brown; George Ford, Ben Youngs; Mako Vunipola, Jamie George, Kyle Sinckler, Maro Itoje, Nick Isiekwe, Chris Robshaw, Tom Curry, Billy Vunipola. Ready for battle: England forwards train at St Stithians College in Sandton ahead of the big clash (Getty) last_img read more

Rugby’s Greatest: Justin Marshall

first_img Major teams: Canterbury, Crusaders, Leeds, Ospreys, Montpellier, SaracensTest span: 1995-2005Test caps: 81 (74 starts)Test points: 120 (24T)Rugby’s Greatest: Justin MarshallFrance, at the old Parc des Princes, is nobody’s idea of an easy Test debut. However, Laurie Mains had a clear motive for giving Justin Marshall his All Blacks bow there on the 1995 European tour. “The French were really aggressive in the rucks and mauls,” the coach said, “and we needed Justin’s ruggedness.”There are more skilful players in our scrum-halves list than Marshall but no one more competitive and ready to scrap than the small-town boy from Mataura, near Invercargill. He became New Zealand’s most-capped No 9, until being overtaken by Aaron Smith.Beginning working life as a butcher in a freezing works, Marshall showed an impeccable sense of timing because All Blacks incumbents Graeme Bachop and Ant Strachan both left for Japan in 1995 – opening the door for Marshall at the start of the pro era.College of knowledge: at a coaching session with Mount Albert Grammar school in 2017 (Getty Images)His physicality and explosive speed around the fringes, where he liked to use players around him to manipulate the defence, made him an instant fit in an All Black team that dominated world rugby in the late Nineties. TAGS: The Greatest Players Explosive: Justin Marshall fires the ball out during New Zealand’s RWC 2003 win v South Africa (Getty) A former butcher, Justin Marshall carved up many a defence for New Zealand in the first decade of professionalism. He is one of the greatest scrum-halves to play the game As impressive as anything was his organising and communication. Aussie McLean, his coach at Canterbury, once said: “People just don’t realise the influence he has out there. He runs everything on defence.”Marshall played 23 consecutive Tests from his Paris debut – losing just once – until a snapped Achilles interrupted the run. As an insatiable trainer, he was back in action two months ahead of schedule.Marshall didn’t have selection all his own way, being ousted by Byron Kelleher for the RWC 1999 semi-final. Responding to criticism that his pass was too slow, Marshall points to the speed with which he got the ball away from the breakdown. Certainly his long-time half-back partner, Andrew Mehrtens, never looked short of time.Appointed New Zealand captain in 1997 at the end of the Sean Fitzpatrick reign, Marshall soon lost the job for upsetting a referee. But he went on starring for his country until 2005, beating the British & Irish Lions and finishing with 24 Test tries before embarking on a lucrative swansong in European club rugby. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Now a much-respected analyst for Sky Sports, Marshall was neatly summed up by his wife Nicolle: “He’s an exclamation mark, not a comma.”Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Fiji Autumn Nations Cup Squad 2020 – Team to Play Georgia

first_img Breakaway: Waisea Nayacalevu of Fiji (Getty Images) Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Round OneSunday 15 Nov, France v Fiji – CANCELLED due to Covid cases in Fiji squad, France awarded 28-0 winRound TwoSaturday 21 Nov, Italy v Fiji – CANCELLED due to Covid outbreakRound ThreeSaturday 28 Nov, Scotland v Fiji – CANCELLED due to Covid outbreakFinals WeekendSaturday 5 Dec, Georgia 24-38 Fiji Related: Fiji’s Nemani Nadolo scores hat-trick against GeorgiaHead here for the full Autumn Nations Cup fixtures list.Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS ForwardsEroni MawiPeni RavaiHaereiti HetetSamuela TawakeMesake DogeJone KoroiduaduaMesulame DolokotoSam MatavesiTevita IkanivereTevita RatuvaLeone NakarawaTemo MayanavanuaChris MinimbiMesulame KunavulaKitione KamikamicaJohnny DyerAlbert TuisueManueli RatuniyarawaLekima Tagitagivalu Vern Cotter selects his playing group for the first time Fiji Autumn Nations Cup Squad Fiji Autumn Nations Cup Squad 2020A Covid outbreak meant that Fiji’s first three Autumn Nations Cup fixtures were cancelled, but they have been given the all clear to play Georgia in the seventh-place play-off at BT Murrayfield.This will be Vern Cotter’s first Test in charge of Fiji and he has named a very strong back-line as well as given first caps to Johnny Dyer, Mesulame Kunavula and Temo Mayanavanua in the pack.Fiji Team to Play Georgia – Saturday 5 DecemberKini Murimurivalu; Josua Tuisova, Semi Radradra (captain), Levani Botia, Nemani Nadolo; Ben Volavola, Frank Lomani; Peni Ravai, Samuel Matavesi, Mesake Doge, Tevita Ratuva, Temo Mayanavanu, Johnny Dyer, Mesulame Kunavula, Albert Tuisue.Replacements: Tevita Ikanivere, Haereiti Hetet, Samuela Tawake, Chris Minimbi, Manueli Ratuniyarawa, Simione Kuruvoli, Seru Vularika, Waisea Nayacalevu.Fiji Team to Play France – Sunday 15 November – CANCELLEDKini Murimurivalu; Josua Tuisova, Waisea Nayacalevu, Levani Botia (captain), Nemani Nadolo; Ben Volavola, Frank Lomani; Peni Ravai, Sam Matavesi, Mesake Doge, Tevita Ratuva, Albert Tuisue, Mesulame Kunavula, Kitione Kamikamica, Johnny Dyer.Replacements: Tevita Ikanivere, Haereiti Hetet, Samuela Tawake, Temo Mayanavanua, Manueli Ratuniyarawa, Simione Kuruvoli, Serupepeli Vularika, Setareki Tuicuvu. BacksFrank LomaniPeni MatawaluSimione KuruvoliBen Volavola, Tuidraki SamusamuvodreSemi RadradraLepani BotiaSerupepeli VularikaJale VatubuaWaisea NayacalevuNemani NadoloJosua TuisovaKini MurimurivaluAutumn Nations Cup Fixtures 2020Dates, kick-off times and TV details for Fiji’s four Autumn Nations Cup matches…last_img read more

Italy v France live stream: How to watch the Six Nations from anywhere

first_imgIf you’re in Austria, Germany or Switzerland, you can watch Italy v France at 3.15pm through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN.Italy v France live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Italy v France is live from 1.05am on beIN Sports 3. Access to beIN Sports’ Connect package is $19.99 a month or $179.99 for a year and also includes lots of European football action. Plus, there is currently a 14-day FREE trial offer, so you could take advantage of that to watch some Six Nations matches!beIN Sports Connect packageYou can also stream beIN Sports’ coverage live and on-demand through Kayo Sports. A basic package is $25 a month and premium is $35 a month – and they are offering a FREE 14-day trial to new customers.Kayo Sports offer We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing.  Italy v France live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to watch the Six Nations from South Africa, SuperSport is the place to go.Italy v France kicks off at 4.15pm on SuperSport Grandstand.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from Access, which has the Blitz and Variety 4 channels, to Premium, which includes all 18 sports channels.Italy v France live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Six Nations matches is NBC, with matches streamed on Peacock Premium, which is available for $4.99 a month.Italy v France will kick off at 9.15am EST and 6.15am on the West Coast.Get Peacock Premium Italy v France live stream: How to watch from the UKThe good news is that all Six Nations matches are available on free-to-air TV in the UK. Italy v France, which kicks off at 2.15pm, will be shown live on ITV in the UK.If you’re from the UK but are overseas when Italy v France takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Italy v France live stream: How to watch from IrelandIn Ireland, Italy v France (2.15pm) is also on free-to-air TV, with Virgin Media One (formerly TV3) broadcasting live coverage of all Six Nations matches. You can also stream live TV through Virgin TV Anywhere if you’d rather watch on your phone, tablet or computer. Italy v France live stream: How to watch from EuropeFrance 2, another free-to-air channel, has the rights to broadcast Italy v France, with kick-off at 3.15pm in France. In Italy, DMAX is showing Italy v France at 3.15pm and you can also live stream matches via its online player Dplay.  Rugby rivalry: France celebrate after scoring against Italy last year (Getty Images) Here is how you can watch Italy v France from across the world Italy v France live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Italy v France from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match starts at 3.15am on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 June 2021 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Italy v France live stream: How to watch from the CanadaSix Nations matches are shown on streaming platform DAZN in Canada.Italy v France will kick off at 9.15am EST and 6.15am on the West Coast.Italy v France live stream: How to watch from AsiaPremier Sports has the rights to broadcast Six Nations matches, like Italy v France, in Asia and will show matches in 22 territories – Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Laos, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam.A weekly pass to Premier Sports Asia is $25.99 or you can take out a rolling six-month contract for $89.99 or a year’s deal is $129.99.Premier Sports Asia subscription Italy v France live stream: How to watch the Six Nations from anywhereItaly will be hoping to end their 27-game losing streak in the Six Nations today in their opening match against France (kick-off 2.15pm), while the visitors will be wanting to start their campaign well as they search for their first title since 2010.Here is how the two teams line up…Italy: Jacopo Truller: Luca Sperandio, Marco Zanon, Ignacio Brex, Montanna Ioane; Paolo Garbisi, Stephen Varney; Cherif Traorè, Luca Bigi (capt), Marco Riccioni, Marco Lazzaroni, David Sisi, Sebastian Negri, Johan Meyer, Michele Lamaro.Replacements: Gianmarco Lucchesi, Danilo Fischetti, Giosué Zilocchi, Niccolò Cannone, Federico Ruzza, Maxime Mbandà, Guglielmo Palazzani, Carlo Canna.France: Brice Dulin; Teddy Thomas, Arthur Vincent, Gaël Fickou, Gabin Villière; Matthieu Jalibert, Antoine Dupont; Cyril Baille, Julien Marchand, Mohamed Haouas, Bernard Le Roux, Paul Willemse, Dylan Cretin, Charles Ollivon (capt), Gregory Alldritt.Replacements: Pierre Bourgarit, Francois Gros, Dorian Aldegheri, Romain Taofifenua, Anthony Jelonch, Baptiste Serin, Louis Carbonel, Damian Penaud.Check out our full match preview here and below we explain how to find a reliable live stream for Italy v France wherever you are.How to watch Italy v France when you’re not in your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Six Nations coverage, like Italy v France, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Six Nations live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

How to watch Six Nations rugby in the USA

first_imgWhile matches kick off in the afternoon in Europe, the time difference means they will begin in the morning in the USA, with Eastern Time five hours behind GMT and the West Coast eight hours behind until the clocks change in mid-March.Looking at this year’s Six Nations fixtures, a 2.15pm kick-off will be 9.15am ET, a 4.45pm kick-off is 11.45am and 3pm is 10am.Peacock is currently available on the Roku platform, Apple devices, Google devices, Microsoft Xbox One, Sony PlayStation4 and PlayStation 4 Pro as well as VIZIO SmartCast TVs and LG Smart TVs. How to watch Six Nations rugby in the USAThe 2021 Six Nations Championship is televised all over the world, so rugby fans across the globe can tune in to watch the best countries in Europe play each other in the historic tournament.If you are in the USA and want to watch the world’s oldest rugby championship, NBC is the official broadcaster and is streaming all Six Nations matches live on Peacock Premium.How to watch the Six Nations in AmericaNBC traditionally showed its rugby content – it also has the rights to cover the Gallagher Premiership and European Champions Cup in America – via its Gold Pass service, but it has now moved everything to Peacock Premium, which costs $4.99 a month and also features coverage of Premier League football.Get Peacock PremiumMatches will also be shown on a delay on NBCSN later in the day if you’d rather watch that way than stream the action. For example, on the opening Saturday, England v Scotland was shown on NBCSN at 11pm.Former England and Lions prop Alex Corbisiero is part of NBC’s rugby ‘team’, as is former USA captain Dan Lyle. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. All the championship matches are available to live stream in the States Action from the opening game of the Six Nations between Italy and France (LightRocket/Getty Images) last_img read more

New Minnesota deans face change with calling and confidence

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Jay Croft says: Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release November 19, 2014 at 9:13 am Because, as the article says, “It was the first church built as a cathedral in the Episcopal Church.” (St. James Cathedral in Chicago is an older congregation, but their building and status as a cathedral is younger). When St. Mark’s was made a cathedral in 1941, the decision was made to retain cathedral status for the building and community in Faribault due to its historic status for the Episcopal Church and for Minnesota.Many thanks for all the well wishes for Paul and me! The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Jonathan Streeter says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 November 18, 2014 at 11:52 pm Hi, Sandy! I remember, fondly, working with you on the Shattuck-St. Mary’s Board of Trustees! Hope all is well. Wishing you God’s blessings, Sarah Rademacher Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Sarah Rademacher says: Janis Froehlig says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska [Episcopal News Service] In the Episcopal Church in Minnesota two new deans have been installed in its two historic cathedrals within nine days of each other. Both are charged with bringing about change. Both face challenges. Both are young and determined.The Very Rev. Justin P. Chapman, 35, was installed as the 19th dean of the Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour in Faribault on Nov. 13, and the Very Rev. Paul J. Lebens-Englund, 40, was installed as the seventh dean of St. Mark’s Cathedral in Minneapolis on Nov. 2.The Very Rev. Paul J. Lebens-Englund, newly installed dean of St. Mark’s Episcopal Cathedral, Minneapolis, stands next to the Anglican Compass Rose in the Cathedral’s crossing, commemorating the 1954 World Anglican Congress. Photo: Joe BjordalAt St. Marks, deep hungerLebens-Englund previously served in several roles in the Diocese of Spokane, including canon to the ordinary. Most recently he was priest-in-charge of St. David’s Episcopal Church in Spokane. He is a graduate of the Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California.The installation of Lebens-Englund marked the conclusion of two years of interim leadership at St. Mark’s. During this time both membership and financial support dropped significantly. A survey conducted during this period, the results of which were published on the cathedral’s website, indicated that major changes are necessary to regain vitality and health. Lebens-Englund said that he was attracted by the challenges ahead and the lay leadership that had developed during the transition period.He said it was “a perfect constellation of factors: fun and creative members, gifted leadership, beautiful worship, synergistic location, intriguing challenges, expansive vision, deep faith, real hope, and concrete expressions of love and compassion.”“Despite my best efforts to avoid the very real heartache and headache of moving a family across the country, it simply became clear to me, to my wife Erica and to our sons, Isaac and Owen, that God was doing the calling; that my particular gifts and unique experiences in the church make me the right person for the position right now. In a very real sense, I’m rediscovering my ‘deep gladness’ as it intersects with St. Mark’s ‘deep hunger,’” said Lebens-Englund.Describing leadership transitions that even under the best of circumstances are “a mix of joy and sadness, hope and despair,” Lebens-Englund said that his starting point “is simply meeting the faith community where it’s at: grieving or celebrating, looking backward or forward as needed and ensuring there is room for every emotional response to our present reality.”“At the same time, because leadership transitions can be so emotionally disorienting, we don’t always bring our ‘best selves’ to these times of change,” he said. “Casting a clear commitment to healthy behavior and mutual accountability within the faith community occurred the very first Sunday at the microphone and a covenant for healthy communication patterns has since been posted around the cathedral and on the website.”St. Mark’s new dean also said that another essential contribution he can add over the next several months is to frame every ‘output’ in terms of sustainability. “Is it essential? Is it life-giving? Is it an individual initiative or an initiative of the whole faith community? Is there someone else better-positioned or equipped to do it? Which programs should persist and which should be laid to rest?”“Our desire to be all things to all people and to address every care and concern around us, while well-meaning, has often spread us all to thin – to the point, in fact, that our core competencies as faith communities often fall out of balance and ‘outputs outpace inputs.’ The body gets tired, sometimes resentful, until at last the ‘what’ and the ‘how’ of our church lives become completely disconnected from the ‘why,’” said Lebens-Englund.“What we’re looking for is a healthy balance – a congregation through which individuals and families can put their faith into action in a meaningful, concrete and life-giving way. We want folks’ experience of God, self and life to be enhanced for having connected with us, not diminished, and that takes clarity, hard work and discipline.”The Very Rev. Justin P. Chapman is formally seated in the dean’s chair at the Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour in Faribault, Minnesota by Bishop Brian N. Prior on Nov. 13. Photo: Joe BjordalIn Faribault, a hopeful spiritCathedral of Our Merciful Saviour’s Chapman previously served as priest associate at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Rochester. He is also a graduate of the Church Divinity School of the Pacific.Chapman’s installation’s marks the end of a relatively brief and smooth transition. Yet, the Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour faces a number of challenges – some similar to those faced by countless other small congregations in small towns. Faribault, located 50 south of Minneapolis, has a population of approximately 24,000. There has been no growth in membership or worship attendance for the past decade.“We are fortunate to have a hopeful spirit,” said Chapman. “Yet, the challenge we face is that our transformation is going to take time and that it isn’t going to look like we think it will.”Chapman noted that one of the big challenges is a “near-total” absence of families with children.“It’s sort of a catch-22: A good children’s program is critical to attracting children, but a critical mass of children is required for a good children’s program. Yet, this apparent vacuum is exciting because it gives us the opportunity to build something entirely new, something that connects people to God and to each other; something that begins to form disciples in a way that’s tailored to our community and culture.”Chapman said a passionate community is ready to take on the challenges.“I was initially attracted to the Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour because of the community – the people, their hospitality, their participation in mission and even their ability to passionately disagree with each other but then truly come together for worship and communion. It gave me the sense (and still does) that this community has the gifts it needs to thrive. We’re in love with community, but we’re not afraid to tell it like it is.”“My sense is that I’m called to help the cathedral community identify, bring forth and develop what it already possesses: a passion for mission and connection,” said Chapman.Connecting with the neighborhoodsThe calling of the two deans comes at a time when the Episcopal Church in Minnesota (no longer referred to as “the Diocese”) is well into a paradigm shift about how it thinks about mission – changes made under the leadership of Bishop Brian Prior, now in the fifth year of his episcopate.Prior has described that shift as coming from a greater understanding of God’s mission in the world (“Missio Dei”) and a change of focus from a particular faith community’s internal life to the life of God in the world. He has challenged the faith communities in Minnesota to discover what God is up to in their neighborhoods and examine the unique context in which they are called to mission and ministry.Minnesota’s new cathedral deans are discovering their new neighborhoods.“We are fortunate to have a huge campus with beautiful buildings in the heart of downtown Faribault,” Chapman said. “I want us to ask three important questions: What is at the core of our belief and community? How do we best form people for mission? hat are the needs around us that God is calling us to engage? Then I want us to leverage our location and spaces to help others.”In Minneapolis, Lebens-Englund has a vision for neighborhood connections based both on St. Mark’s role as a congregation located in a major metropolitan area and as the lead cathedral for the Episcopal Church in Minnesota.“The most obvious neighbors with whom we need to be in conversation as a ‘congregation’ are, in my early estimation, the Walker Art Center, Metropolitan Community Technical College, the Loring Park Neighborhood Association, the Episcopal faith communities in the Central Mission Area and the downtown Minneapolis interfaith community,” said Lebens-Englund.“The most obvious neighbors with whom we need to be in conversation as a ‘cathedral’ are, in my early estimation, the faith communities of the entire Episcopal Church in Minnesota, the mayor’s office, the state Capitol, the other cathedrals in the Episcopal Church and those cathedrals with whom we share a more global partnership.”“Radical hospitality – despite its having become a cliché over the last decade – is still what I’m all about, trusting that disruption is often a sign of the Spirit’s presence, though we generally aspire to ‘deep peace,’ ” said Lebens-Englund.No fear of failureBoth young Minnesota deans are focused on success as they begin their new ministries with a healthy understanding of their roles.“I think I can succeed because I don’t think I’m the center of the mission and I’m not afraid to fail,” said Chapman. “I see my calling as helping the community to tap into God’s dream for us and to begin to take steps to live that out. Our success does not depend on me, it depends on God. My job – our job – is to do our best to discern God’s call to us and to live it out. That means trying a bunch of new ideas, knowing that some are bound to fail, but being confident that success will come.”“Failure is hard at first because we are used to the idea that it’s bad – that we are doing the wrong thing – but that’s not the case at all. Failure is a sign that we are trying and that we are zeroing in on the mission God has for us. Once you get used to the fact that failure is just one of the steps to success, it actually becomes kind of fun. It’s not necessary to do things perfectly, it’s just enough to begin. God will take care of the rest.”The Minneapolis dean has a similar understanding.“The good news here is that it’s not all about me in the end, but is about connecting the faith community to the heart of God,” said Lebens-Englund.“When it comes to God, I’m an eternal optimist, trusting, as they say, that the arc of history does, indeed, bend toward justice. But, as a pastor, when it comes to real people working out their salvation in the context of an intentional, experimental community, I’m a realist. The glimpses of the Kingdom are sometimes few and far between, but they are there, for sure, and my task is simply to name them, to celebrate them, and see if we can’t enable the next breakthrough sooner than later.”“I don’t know fully what God has in store for us,” said Chapman. “But I do now that it’s going to be incredible.”How did the Episcopal Church in Minnesota come to have two cathedrals?The history surrounding both is rich with the hope and promise that settled the northern state.The congregation of St. Mark’s Free Mission was established in 1858 in north Minneapolis, an outreach mission of Gethsemane Episcopal Church in downtown Minneapolis, which started 29 congregations throughout the diocese. St. Mark’s relocated to the heart of downtown Minneapolis in the late 1860s and moved into its new, cathedral-like building on southwest edge of downtown Minneapolis in 1910.St. Mark’s was consecrated a cathedral in 1941 by then Bishop Stephen Keeler. It was Keeler who was instrumental in attracting the 1954 World Anglican Congress to Minneapolis and St. Mark’s. For 10 days in August of that year nearly 700 bishops, priests and lay people from the then 15 provinces of the Anglican Communion met for the first such gathering to be held outside Great Britain. It was for this congress that the now internationally-recognized emblem of the Communion – the Anglican Compass Rose – was designed and first used. Thus, St. Mark’s is also known as the birthplace of the Anglican Compass Rose.The Faribault cathedral abides because of its unique history. The Right Rev. Henry Benjamin Whipple, consecrated the first bishop of the Diocese of Minnesota in 1858, laid the cornerstone of the Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour on July 16,1862. It was the first church built as a cathedral in the Episcopal Church. Because of lack of funds in the young, missionary diocese, the cathedral would not be completed for seven years. It was consecrated in 1869.Bishop Whipple visited the work of the church in Minnesota for a year, considering potential locations for the seat of the new diocese. The primary educational institutions of the young diocese (some established by the legendary Episcopal missionary, the Rev. James Lloyd Breck): Shattuck School for Boys, St. Mary’s School for Girls and Seabury Divinity School would be clustered there. He finally chose Faribault. Because it was at the crossroads of the Ojibwa, Dakota and European settlements; at the meeting point of the woodlands and prairie; and at the confluence of two rivers, it was anticipated to grow into a major center of commerce. It was not to be. The town, 50 miles south of the capital, has a population of only 24,000.Like St. Mark’s, the Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour has hosted historic Anglican gatherings. The delegates to the 1895 General Convention of the Episcopal Church, held in Minneapolis, took a day off from business and traveled to Faribault on train cars provided by Whipple’s friend James J. Hill. In Faribault they were met by 400 horse-drawn carriages providing transportation for a tour of what Harper’s Magazine that same year called “Episcopal Faribault.” The delegates to the 1954 World Anglican Congress also visited Faribault and the Cathedral – described to Bishop Keeler through many letters as a highlight of the gathering.– Joe Bjordal is a writer, designer, photographer, and event planner based in Minneapolis. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing December 10, 2014 at 3:32 pm Thank youfor your bridging words, Polly! Yes, we are beginning to warm already as we recognize how blessed we are. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Brian Wilson says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Justin Chapman says: Rector Belleville, IL Sanford Hampton says: Featured Events By Joe BjordalPosted Nov 18, 2014 Press Release Service Mark Hatch says: November 19, 2014 at 10:25 am Ahh, Sandy Hampton! He once invited me to preach; his church didn’t have an 8 am Eucharist but did have a 7:30 am! So, I had to get up very, very early on a Sunday morning to get to his church.But the upside for inviting me was that he later became a bishop! When angling for opportunities to visit churches, I usually mentioned that, as an incentive for the rector to invite me.(By the way, Gayle Harris also invited me and she, too, became a bishop!)–Rev. Jay Croft The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Albany, NY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Comments (9) This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY November 18, 2014 at 7:32 pm I wish both Paul and Justin well.I had the privilege of Presiding a number of times at both of these historic cathedrals while serving as Bishop Suffragan of Minnesota (1989-1996). It might be of interest that I was honored to be the first Bishop consecrated by a woman, Barbara Harris, on April 5, 1989 at St. Mark’s Cathedral just about two months after her own. Barbara received a standing ovation from those assembled. November 19, 2014 at 3:04 am Oh this will be a sunny time for Minnesota! In Spokane we grieve the departure of Paul Lebens-Englund and his family. At the Cathedral of St John the Evangelist we watched this family grow. Under Paul’s leadership the best of every person and every age and all abilities emerged. Next he was called to ignite the embers of a tiny dying but treasured church in the poorest section of our community. Under Paul’s leadership and vision this little church became a powerful engine of social change. Later Paul’s skills and quiet forceful leadership were called to the Diocese of Spokane. Finally after a priest was called to a new post, Paul assumed the leadership of St David’s in Spokane. Whenever there is disruption Paul brings calm. Where there is hurt he brings healing. And laughter. You will share much laughter. He is such a dynamo and he always has been the wise voice in times of strife, frustration and deep questioning. He is sane and kind and good. His wife Erica is a strong woman, an excellent teacher, and the best Mama ever. The boys have grown from toddlers crawling on the altar to fine young men. Oh yes Minnesota – you are blessed. You will have new rays of sunshine to warm you this winter and all the seasons beyond. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT November 18, 2014 at 6:05 pm I don’t know Rev. Lebens-Englund, but I do know Rev. Chapman, and I know the work of CDSP in forming mission leaders for the 21st Century. It is up to inspired congregations and leaders like these to shape our church’s next incarnation. Our future won’t look like our past. It shouldn’t. Godspeed to the people in Minnesota and to all people seeking to extend the message of God’s radical love out into the wider world. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA November 18, 2014 at 9:45 pm I had the pleasure of knowing Fr. Chapman at St. Luke’s in Rochester both as a parishioner and member of the Vestry. I heartily commend Faribault in their selection and wish only the best to both of the new Deans. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Minnesota deans face change with calling and confidence Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Polly McMahon says: Comments are closed. November 18, 2014 at 5:05 pm I am sure this has been studied, and I am sure there is an answer, though it is unknown to me: why are there still 2 cathedrals, just 50 miles apart, in Minnesota? Thank you. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

In Paris, do we have to love our enemies? Bishop…

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Pierre WhalonPosted Nov 14, 2015 Rector Knoxville, TN November 19, 2015 at 12:01 pm Actually she WAS talking about the Jim Crow era. As well as choices people have in how to deal with violence and oppression. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Thomas Hofer says: November 14, 2015 at 4:05 pm Bishop Whalon addressed this matter eloquently, and I fully support him! Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY mary rosendahl says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service] Bishop Pierre Whalon of the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe has issued the following statement in the aftermath of the Nov. 13 terrorist attacks in Paris.November 14, 2015How can we pray this prayer of all prayers, here in Paris, the day after?O God, the Father of all, whose Son commanded us to love our enemies: Lead them and us from prejudice to truth: deliver them and us from hatred, cruelty, and revenge; and in your good time enable us all to stand reconciled before you, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. (Book of Common Prayer, p. 818.)Yes, Jesus did command us: “love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.” “Love your enemies and do good to those who hate you.” (Matt. 5:44; Luke 6:27). Really? Yesterday several terrorists killed at least 128 people in 6 separate but coordinated attacks here in Paris. According to the Islamic State group, Da’ech, this was planned in advance and ordered from their base in Syria, in retaliation for the French involvement there.The French president, François Hollande, has promised to reply in kind: “We will be merciless.” Meanwhile, hundreds of families are mourning their dead and wounded, attacked simply for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. The Charlie Hebdo and Hypercacher attacks in January were targeted specifically; these six attacks were against “targets of opportunity,” as the military says.“Love your enemies and do good to those who hate you.” Doesn’t that just “enable” them?Here is where our baptismal promise to “follow and obey Jesus as Lord” cuts into our lives. We should do good to those who hate us, because Jesus has told us to. So how can we?First, I think we need to see that loving the enemy who can do such things to us is not just vapid idealism. The whole point of the Christian story is summed up thus: “While we were yet his enemies, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5: 6-10) In other words, God shows love for us precisely by putting off the divine power that we crave. The day after this heinous attack, we may wish for God to come down and wipe out our enemies. Instead, Christ on the cross, completely powerless at the last, shows us that it is only love that can overcome hatred, evil and even death.Jesus asks us to follow his way, as love is the only power in this world that can literally and figuratively save us. He certainly did not “enable” his enemies. In the short term, we need the police and the military, and we should be grateful that Parisians have such courageous and professional forces. They and the firefighters and emergency medical teams need our prayers and deserve our support. Not to mention the wounded and dead, and their families and friends.But the question of their assassins concerns not only us here and now, but the whole human race. What word do we have for these people? Our first instincts are to demonize them. . . to label them as “Islamic fundamentalists” or some such, and cheer as the Rafale bombers carry out a massive campaign in retaliation. But this is too simple. It is not what Jesus would have us do. What he wants is harder.When we baptize or confirm people, Episcopalians always repeat the promise to “strive for justice and peace among all people”… We need therefore to chart a way to make peace. Peace, not appeasement or total war. In order to be able to do that, we first need to turn back to Jesus and ask for help.Like this:O God, the Father of all, whose Son commanded us to love our enemies: Lead them and us from prejudice to truth: deliver them and us from hatred, cruelty, and revenge; and in your good time enable us all to stand reconciled before you, through Jesus Christ our Lord.Amen.EventOn Nov. 17, the Rt. Rev. Pierre Whalon will host a meeting of the L’Union mondiale des experts de l’Islam pour la paix et contre la violence (World Union of Experts of Islam for Peace and against Violence). The meeting is part of the project Islam et Vivre ensemble, a schedule of meetings and events tied to the International Day of Tolerance (Nov. 16). From Nov. 10-20, a delegation of Imams from the Union Mondiale are making their voices heard in Paris and in Brussels. In addition to the Imams’ presentations to be made at the Nov. 17 meeting, to be held at the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, Paris, scheduled events include participation in various conferences and high-level meetings at the European Parliament, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (France), the Assemblée Nationale and the Senate (France) and UNESCO.About World Union of Experts for Peace and against ViolenceThe organization, created in June 2015, is a group of 9 renown Imams from eight countries and three continents (Australia, France, Serbia, Lebanon, Spain, Palestine, the United States, and Egypt). In light of the atrocities committed by extremists in the name of Islam, the organization exists to spread a message of peace between people and religions through books, preaching, newspapers, media, internet; to promote the reform of traditions and heritage, both oral and written.Meetings for the World Union were organized with support from the Franco-Egyptian Organization for Human Rights. OFEDH is a French-based organization that promotes peaceful co-existence between religions and respect for human rights. OFEDH organizes meetings, seminars, conferences and rallies, mainly in Paris and Cairo. Amy Gay+ says: November 15, 2015 at 2:27 am Thank you so much for this, Pierre. November 14, 2015 at 7:31 pm I would bge interested to hear all of your thoughts if a muslim had a knife to the throat of your wife or daughter. Once again as at the start of WWII The Episcopal Church might be too heavenly minded to be of any Earthly good. Anne Hodges-Copple says: Margot Shields says: Leon Schoeman says: November 14, 2015 at 5:37 pm This is truly where the rubber hits the road for us followers of Jesus Christ. It surely does not feel good or satisfy our human need for vengeance, but as my deal friend Pierre points out, our Lord does not give us that choice. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Katherine Johnson says: Rector Washington, DC Bruce Bogin says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY November 19, 2015 at 12:31 am I’m tired of hearing the debates. My husband and I have two bedrooms upstairs. We anticipate our diocese helping with placement of refugees in the future. November 16, 2015 at 12:03 pm As I read some of the above comments I cannot help but think of the United States during the Jim Crow era – the lynchings and beatings and reign of terror that blacks in the South lived under, the extraordinary Gospel-informed restraint shown by civil rights protesters. I think of India and Mahatma Gandhi’s non-violent resistance. “Turn the other cheek” was put into mighty powerful action in these instances — not pie in the sky, not unrealistic and devoid of real life consequences. Or does staying true to one’s faith when under threat only matter if those being killed and terrorized are black and brown? Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET November 14, 2015 at 8:43 pm Being a Christian means to follow Christ when He says: “Love your enemy.” It is rather simple, in spite myself, when I complicate it otherwise. Bishop Whalon provides clear spiritual direction – a path of peace. Any call to violence, which there will be, is original from the evil in all of us which we are to resist. If we don’t, we partake in exactly the original evil we despise…. Vicki Gray says: November 15, 2015 at 7:18 am Thanks, Bishop Pierre, and I second Bishop Anne’so comment. The Rev. Molly Elizabeth Haws says: November 19, 2015 at 8:06 pm Ed Lane is the only voice of sanity and reason here. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Ed Lane says: November 15, 2015 at 6:32 pm Got that right. Why is it that all these highly educated clergy have no common sense and would rather commit suicide and let their families be killed rather than stand on their hind legs and defend themselves. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 November 16, 2015 at 11:54 pm Bishop Whalon is, as usual, both eloquent and pastoral. Praying for our enemies is a bitter pill to swallow. For me this is an even more diffìcult prayer than “Thy will be done.” But we are told that discipleship demands no less. Thank you +Pierre for your gentle but powerful reminder where our hearts should be turned. Nous sommes tous Parisiens. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group November 15, 2015 at 12:11 am This is indeed a time for prayer and Bishops Curry and Whalon have struck just the right tone. It is also a time, not for the fear and purple rage the terrorists seek to incite in us, but for reflection…a time perhaps to ask the question we avoided after 9/11 – Why do they hate us? To the extent we can find the answers to that question, then maybe we can shape an effective, hopefully reconciling strategy to counter the evil of ISIS and restore a degree of peace and hope to the people of the Middle East and, in doing so, to the people of Europe and America. Naj Kutait-Faulkner says: Lyn Rundberg says: Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET November 15, 2015 at 6:30 pm The Jews tried to reason with the Nazis didn’t they. The muslims were declared Aryan by Hitler and even had their own Waffen SS formation. When we listen to that? cynthia wicox says: Comments (28) November 16, 2015 at 10:00 pm I think some words written here are sincere, but I wonder if some are written because they are words that “should” be written. Today, I don’t think I’d pass the “Christian” test….maybe by Sunday. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem November 16, 2015 at 9:33 am Jesus was NOT letting other people be hurt, only him. He didn’t lead his disciples to slaughter, and was always protective of them when the Pharisees tried to put them down. Jesus took responsibility for himself and set an example. I think all his life shows us he didn’t think it was okay to let evil prevail in the world. Loving your enemies and praying for them is not about not stopping them from hurting others!! Paul Garrett says: November 14, 2015 at 10:37 pm Mr Lane,If a Muslim had knife to the throat of my wife or daughter, I imagine that I would be out of my mind with terror and rage. I have no doubt that, like Peter at the arrest of Jesus, I would draw my sword, and that I would draw it with intent to kill. That is the brokenness of my humanity. Christ went to the cross to rescue us from that brokenness.Jesus said to Peter, “Put away your sword.” When will we, who claim to be his followers, finally listen to him? Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Jack Zamboni says: Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET November 14, 2015 at 8:12 pm Thank you, +Pierre. November 15, 2015 at 10:02 pm Is it a sin to harm your enemy to protect your loved ones, not to mention your self? I think not. Bruce Bogin said it well. While there’s a theological position of “turning the other cheek,” I don’t faith requires that we martyr ourselves or our loved ones. Rector Albany, NY Ed Lane says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Rt. Rev. David Bane says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID November 14, 2015 at 7:47 pm O Lord hear our prayer….. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Kirk Hollingsworth says: Nadya Lawson says: November 14, 2015 at 8:22 pm Have you considering updating General Patton’ s Prayer as written by Msg O’ Neil and considered the quick response it received ? Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Ed Lane says: November 16, 2015 at 6:14 pm I’m sorry but you are a very foolish person. Hopefully you will never have to face evil, if you do I hope that you remember by your thinking that you must lay down and allow yourself to be murdered. Liberal psyco-babble viewpoint will not protect you. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska November 14, 2015 at 10:35 pm Ron you might read Mark Twain’s prayer before you pray Patton’s. http://warprayer.org Ed Lane says: November 14, 2015 at 6:44 pm i do not dislike muslims. i dislike the radicals whole heartedly. why? because i know if any one of us showed mercy to, say one of their family members, maybe a child of theirs, they would not hesitate to kill us on the spot, post the event.perhaps i am not a Christian after all.perhaps not. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Events Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Fanny Belanger says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS November 17, 2015 at 10:40 am Indeed? I suppose you prefer Nat Turner to Martin Luther King? Black people in the Jim Crow South should have sought out the KKK and slaughtered them? Maybe you think that the people killed in that South Carolina Church died because they were too liberal to be armed? Maybe I should arm myself so that the next time a racist cop stops me or my son or anyone else I love for no reason at all I can respond in the appropriate human way and not in the way my FAITH tells me to. Why is it easier to call me foolish, without knowing anything of any evil I might have faced, than to think about how to meet the challenge of what Jesus calls us to do and why? I know it’s hard and that I might fail — but I also know that Christians are called to wholeness with others and with God. If our actions don’t reflect our beliefs what is the point? November 18, 2015 at 7:57 pm We are not talking about black people in the Jim Crow era, stick to the point. November 15, 2015 at 7:34 am I do not see anything contradictory between loving your enemies and preventing them from doing harm to you or your loved ones or your country. If someone tries to harm me or members of my family or my neighbor, I am going to try to stop him with all means at my command including killing him if necessary. I don’t hate him. I simply want to prevent him from doing harm. It is the same with wars which I consider necessary such as WWII. It would have been unthinkable to permit Hitler and Nazi Germany to control most of the world. It was a cruel and evil empire. No one had to hate them and their evil dees, but we did have to stop them. You can love ISIS all you like, but that does not say that we should not try to stop and turn back this type of evil. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ron Davin says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Nadya Lawson says: Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA In Paris, do we have to love our enemies? Bishop Whalon statement Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ed Lane says: Gordon Odell says: Kit Carlson says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group November 15, 2015 at 5:52 am Thank you, +Pierre. This is our prayer and this is is our call. You are right, Bishop Whalon: overcoming evil by waging relentless acts of love for our neighbors is harder work than revenge. God help us all. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more

Duncan, Barnett join staff of Washington National Cathedral

first_imgDuncan, Barnett join staff of Washington National Cathedral New canon, associate to expand worship repertoire and worship Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Washington National Cathedral] The Rev. Dr. Rosemarie Logan Duncan of St. Columba’s Episcopal Church in Washington D.C. has been named canon for worship at Washington National Cathedral and the Rev. Andrew Barnett, founder of Theodicy Jazz Collective, has been named the cathedral’s associate for music and worship.The new appointments were announced by the Rt. Rev. Mariann Edgar Budde, bishop of Washington and interim dean of the cathedral.“The cathedral has a unique vocation to be a house of prayer for all people,” Budde said. “Together with Canon Mike McCarthy, Rose and Andy will help express that call with an expanded worship repertoire and music that expresses the breadth of Anglican and other Christian traditions including jazz, gospel music, and global song.”Duncan, who will take up her new post in mid-May, is a native of Washington D.C. who has served as associate rector at St. Columba’s for eleven years. She holds bachelor, master and doctoral degrees from Howard University and a master of divinity and doctor of ministry from Virginia Theological Seminary.Before she was ordained to the priesthood in 2006, Duncan was a church musician, clinical psychologist for the DC General Hospital and the DC Department of Mental Health Services and researcher for the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. She founded the Voices of Praise Choir at St. George’s Episcopal Church in Washington D.C. and the Contemporary Sacred Singers at Virginia Theological Seminary and is a member of the DC Federation of Musicians and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority.“I hope to work collaboratively with the cathedral staff to enhance its rich liturgical tradition and explore ways to expand the worship experience to reflect the ever increasing diversity of our people,” she said.Barnett, who has led worship and music at cathedrals across the Episcopal Church and in England, currently holds the Bishop’s Chair for Environmental Studies at Campbell Hall Episcopal School in Los Angeles and serves at All Saints Church, Beverly Hills. He holds a bachelor degree from Oberlin College, master degrees from Yale Environmental School and Berkeley Divinity School at Yale, and a certificate in liturgical studies from the Yale Institute of Sacred Music.“I’m drawn to this notion of a ‘house of prayer for all people’ because we so need shared sacred space where we might gather with the saints at all times and from all places. Now, more than ever, we need ways to come together. That’s why Washington National Cathedral plays a unique role in the life of our country, and I’m honored to join the talented team that serves God and the mission of Jesus through worship at the cathedral.”He will begin his work at the cathedral in mid-August. Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA People Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Posted Mar 18, 2016 Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

Première femme afro-américaine élue évêque diocésain

first_img Submit a Press Release Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Elections, Rector Belleville, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows élue évêque du diocèse d’Indianapolis. Photo : Diocèse d’Indianapolis[Diocèse épiscopal d’Indianapolis] La révérende Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows a été élue onzième évêque du diocèse épiscopal d’Indianapolis, au second tour de scrutin le 28 octobre à la cathédrale Christ Church d’Indianapolis.Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows, âgée de 50 ans, est la première femme afro-américaine élue évêque diocésain dans l’Église épiscopale.Elle a été élue par 67 voix pour l’ordre du clergé et 82 pour l’ordre laïc.Son élection a marqué l’aboutissement d’un processus de près de deux ans de discernement et de sélection par le diocèse, lors de la 179e convention diocésaine.Catherine M. Waynick (l’actuelle évêque NDLR) prévoit de prendre sa retraite au printemps 2017.Les quatre autres candidats étaient :La révérende Grace Burton-Edwards, recteur de l’église épiscopale St Thomas de Columbus (État de Géorgie)Le révérend chanoine Bruce Gray, canon de l’ordinaire, du diocèse d’IndianapolisLe révérend chanoine Patrick Lance Ousley, prêtre et directeur, de la paroisse et de l’école maternelle de l’église épiscopale St John de Kirkland (État de Washington), chanoine chargé de stewardship (collecte des dons) et du développement du diocèse d’Olympia etLa révérende Dina van Klaveren, recteure de l’église épiscopale St Andrew de Glenwood (État du Maryland).De plus amples informations sur la sélection de l’évêque et les candidats sont disponibles ici.Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows est actuellement directrice de la gestion des contacts et relations pour le diocèse de Chicago. Son rôle est de développer des partenariats et relations pour le renouveau de l’église.« En dix-neuf ans de ministère ordonné, et tout particulièrement au cours des cinq dernières années passées à superviser et à réorganiser le diocèse de Chicago, j’ai soutenu des communautés dans leur démarche de transformation, j’ai communiqué une vision d’espoir et j’ai rassemblé et mis en relation le peuple de Dieu par delà les distances et les différences », explique Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows. « Je crois que ces expériences m’ont préparée à encadrer et servir dans ce lieu particulier qu’est le diocèse d’Indianapolis ».Elle est de New York, ordonnée par le diocèse de Central New York et est diplômée de Smith College, Cornell University et Church Divinity School of the Pacific. Elle a l’expérience de la conservation du patrimoine et se passionne notamment pour les questions de violence armée, justice sociale, réconciliation raciale et entre les classes sociales. L’un des ses principaux centres d’intérêt est de guider les autres à travers la pratique de l’accompagnement spirituel.L’une des expériences marquante de son ministère tient au jour où elle s’est trouvée près du World Trade Center, le matin du 11 septembre 2001. Dans une situation effrayante, sa propre foi et la foi d’autres personnes qui cherchaient un abri tout comme elle, lui ont apporté la perspective renouvelée de la foi victorieuse sur la peur.« C’est dans l’Église épiscopale que j’ai trouvé ma relation à Jésus, il y a une trentaine d’années », confie-t-elle. « Elle m’enseigne que le monde est débordant de beautés incroyables et de douleurs indescriptibles et que Dieu est profondément au milieu de tout cela et nous aime tous avec acharnement. Aussi chaque jour, nourrie par les sacrements et les récits de notre foi, la beauté de notre tradition liturgique, le vaste éventail de cette communauté chrétienne, je ne cesse d’apprendre comment vivre sans crainte ».Sous réserve du consentement canonique nécessaire d’une majorité des comités permanents diocésains et des évêques dotés de juridiction de l’Église épiscopale, Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows sera ordonnée et consacrée évêque du diocèse d’Indianapolis le 29 avril 2017 au Clowes Hall de Butler University.— Episcopal News Service a contribué au présent article. Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls House of Bishops Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Posted Oct 28, 2016 Tags Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Première femme afro-américaine élue évêque diocésain Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows élue 11e évêque d’Indianapolis Rector Bath, NC Ethnic Ministries, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more