Retired Judge Orlando’s focus stays on children

first_imgRetired Judge Orlando’s focus stays on children December 1, 2000 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular News Retired Judge Orlando’s focus stays on children Associate Editor Retired 17th Circuit Judge Frank Orlando has gone international. In a recent whirlwind of global activity, he was busy zapping e-mails about the Ebola outbreak to colleagues trying to stop child slavery in Uganda; personally training interns in Geneva, Switzerland; and visiting Macedonia where young children hawk cigarettes on the streets rather than attend school. The director of the Center for the Study of Youth Policy at the Nova Southeastern University law school, as well as a member of The Florida Bar’s Commission on the Legal Needs of Children, has yet another new title that speaks to his passion to help children: He’s the new director of juvenile justice with the International Network on Juvenile Justice. Launched in 1997 by the Defence for Children International, the INJJ brings together nonprofit organizations, academic institutions and individual experts active in the field of juvenile justice. Coordinated by the DCI International Secretariat in Geneva with more than 200 partners worldwide, the mission is to promote international standards on the rights of children and juvenile justice. Judge Orlando calls his international assignment “a new stage in my life that makes me feel good” to contribute on a global scale. “What makes it possible for me to do this and still be connected with the law school is the fact that Nova is the most wired law school in the world,” Judge Orlando said. “All day yesterday, I was on the Internet with one of the interns going over a program that will be presented in Uganda. They are very concerned about the Ebola outbreak.” And he’s been exchanging e-mails — that are translated from English into Macedonian and vice versa — about recommendations from the Macedonia summit on the legal rights of children he recently participated in that will be presented to their parliament. “What stuck with me is the commitment the people in Macedonia have to learning more about helping at-risk children and the tremendous involvement of people I consider my colleagues — other lawyers,” Judge Orlando said in an interview wedged between two recent back-to-back trips to Europe. “It made me think of all the lawyers I know who are engaged in the same kinds of things and rarely get recognized for their work.” In Macedonia, Orlando met with other judges, high-ranking police and government officials and child protection officers. There, they are grappling with too few social services and too many drugs pouring in from Albania. He witnessed young children hawking black-market cigarettes on the streets, rather than attending school. And he was struck with the thought that in America parents struggle to keep kids in school — while, in places like Macedonia, they struggle just to have schools for the children to attend. He visited a juvenile facility in Macedonia that housed 23 boys, ages 14 to 18. “All, I would venture to say, would be prosecuted as adults in our country,” Judge Orlando said. “There, they recognize the value of a child, and that a child, especially an adolescent, is very different from an adult. What I said to them: `You’ve done a lot of the same things we’ve done in America. Many countries learn from us. But in this instance, I believe our country could learn from you.’” In Macedonia, he said, it would never enter their minds to lock up teens in adult prisons. Too often in this country — with large numbers of children incarcerated for nonviolent crimes as juveniles and Florida leading the way with the transfer of children to adult court — Judge Orlando bemoans: “We have always known that children are different, but we continue the mistakes of the past.” The lesson that should be learned from America’s 100 years of a separate juvenile justice system, he said, is this: “Any reform involving children is very fragile. They are vulnerable to the changing political climate and have the least say in their own defense.” Fighting for the rights of children is Judge Orlando’s passion, which he also expresses through his work on a project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Called the Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative, the project seeks to reduce the unnecessary detention of delinquent children and assure that children in the juvenile justice system receive appropriate services. Part of his new role with the International Network on Juvenile Justice, Judge Orlando said, is to raise interest in the United States to ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Though the U.S. bills itself as the world’s most progressive force for human rights, Judge Orlando points out, it is one of only two countries in the world — besides Somalia — not to ratify what is considered by Amnesty International to be the main human rights instrument relating to children. “It is the policy of the world to think of children as valued citizens, not possessions,” Judge Orlando. In emerging countries, he said, the challenge is to convince leaders in those countries that children do have rights. “Here, in this country, we do recognize that children have rights. We have the policies. Are they in practice? That’s another thing,” Judge Orlando said. “We give lip service to protecting children’s rights. Otherwise, we wouldn’t have so many children in prison.” While he gains a broader global perspective, Judge Orlando knows there is still much work left to do here at home.last_img

Broncos sad Miller won’t have big year he worked so hard for

first_img September 9, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditENGLEWOOD, Colo. (AP) — Von Miller was primed for a monster comeback in 2020 after packing on the muscle this spring, doubling down on his leadership duties after watching Kobe Bryant’s funeral and Michael Jordan’s documentary, then absolutely destroying offensive drills every day at training camp.It all crumbled when the Super Bowl 50 MVP suffered a serious ankle injury at an indoor practice Tuesday, almost certainly costing him a chance to atone for last season’s drop-off that helped fuel his offseason rededication. “It was just a normal play,” coach Vic Fangio said Wednesday. “He just rushed around the edge and never hit the ground, never looked bad. If you saw the video you’d think nothing happened, but it did.” The feeling around team headquarters was that of heartache for Miller but there wasn’t a sense the team was feeling sorry for itself. “Without a doubt, it’s a punch in the gut for everybody just knowing how good of a player he is and how good of a leader he is for this team,” quarterback Drew Lock said. “And personally for him, I talked to him a lot in the offseason. He was gunning. He was ready to go. He was extremely excited, a new focus from Von. “It definitely hurts our team … but life goes on,” Lock added. “He’s going to work to get back on the field as fast as possible and we’ve got to work to win games.”Safety Justin Simmons said he’s certain Miller will put that same energy into his rehab that he did into his offseason of transformation.“It’s just a huge, beyond words huge, loss for our defense,” Simmons said. Broncos sad Miller won’t have big year he worked so hard for “And we have a good enough team to do that. If you’re a good enough team you can overcome these injuries. There’s countless examples of that over the years, very recently, very long time ago, any time you want to look at, there’s been these types of injuries that teams have overcome and still had successful seasons,” Fangio added. “And we want to be added to that list.”Fangio noted the Broncos went 7-5 last year after losing Chubb in Week 4.“We played our best football after that, and that’s not because we didn’t have Bradley; we just kept developing as a team and we compensated for him,” Fangio said. “And we have a better team this year overall. So, I expect us to still be a good team without Von.”There’s no denying, however, that it just got a whole lot tougher for the Broncos to return to the playoffs this year and avoid becoming the first Super Bowl champion to spend the following five seasons missing out on the playoffs altogether. ___Follow Arnie Melendrez Stapleton on Twitter: http://twitter.com/arniestapleton___More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL The Broncos open the season Monday night at home against Tennessee, and the Titans were also dispirited over the loss of one of the league’s best ambassadors.“You’re looking at the Hall of Fame-caliber player who’s played at a high level since he’s entered into this league,” Titans coach Mike Vrabel said. “The Broncos have an incredible defense. Obviously, Von Miller will be missed. I feel horrible for that guy,” Titans left tackle Taylor Lewan said. “The handful of times I’ve been around him, he’s been a stand-up dude. He’s one of those people that doesn’t know how much of a star he actually is by the way he acts and treats other people.” ___ AP Pro Football Writer Teresa M. Walker contributed. Associated Press Miller is seeking additional medical advice before undergoing surgery and is expected to miss the season.“I’m sad that he’s not going to get the season that he worked for because it would have been fun to watch,” Fangio said. “For me. For him. For you. For everybody.”Malik Reed and Jeremiah Attaochu, who filled the void when Miller’s pass rushing partner Bradley Chubb tore an ACL a year ago, will share the workload now. Fangio stressed, however, that they’re not the only ones who will have to step up their game on the field or in the huddle. “The whole team has to pick up the void,” Fangio said. “It’s not the player that ends up playing for him. It’s not the defense, it’s not the offense, it’s not the special teams. It’s everybody. When you lose a player of that caliber, everybody’s got to pick up the slack — in all facets — on the field and off the field, in the locker room.last_img read more

Students can access free tutorials

first_imgUSC has obtained a campus-wide license that grants free access for all current university students, faculty and staff to Lynda.com, a website that offers more than 900 training videos on a broad range of web programs and computing topics.Programs · Aditya Thingle, a graduate student studying computer science, and Courtney Churukian, a staff member, work at the KOH lab. – Anna Wierzbowska | Daily Trojan Some of the instructional videos on Lynda.com include programs for web development, social media sites, video and audio production, Google applications and Microsoft Office.Among the offerings, Lynda.com offers a tutorial on Microsoft Word 2010 that teaches one how to mail merge documents to save time.The courses are divided into five to 15 minute tutorials, and topics can be searched by subject or software on the website. Students who use Avid to edit film footage can utilize these tutorials to learn the essentials on importing and exporting footage along with many other shortcuts.Kevin Durkin, the director of communications for ITS, said the idea came from an advisory group called the Strategic Technology Forum, which is composed of IT leaders from the university.“In this forum, the discussion came up from a desire to have something to do with self-training,” Durkin said. “A subcommittee was formed in partnership with STF, and the university eventually got a campus-wide license.”Tiffany Lee, a junior majoring in communication, sais this website will be a useful tool, especially for students in the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.“Annenberg students often have to familiarize themselves with up-and-coming types of technology and media, so it will be very beneficial for students to learn how to use these various technologies extensively,” Lee said.Professors at the university have also expressed interest in using Lynda.com to further hone their technological skills, according to Durkin.“Industry standards change so quickly in our field that an instructor who isn’t actively practicing can easily fall behind,” said Haven Lin-Kirk, area head of design at the Roski School of Fine Arts. “With everyone’s busy schedules, it’s much more convenient to update your skills in your free time.”Lin-Kirk also said she plans to integrate the program into Roski’s curriculum.Click here to go to http://www.usc.edu/its/lynda, then go to “Log in to Lynda.com” and enter your USC username and password.“The FA203 Digital Tools for Design Course will use Lynda.com as a supplement to the curriculum that is already in place,” Lin-Kirk said. “Though it will not replace any of the existing lectures or in-class materials, there is also quite a bit that is available through the service that is not covered in our courses.”Lexie Cook, a senior majoring in broadcast journalism, said she thinks having access to this site could help give students an edge in the job search, as well.“Companies look for college graduates who are proficient in many different computer programs, so the more programs students can learn while they’re in school, the better their resume will be,” Cook said.ITS plans to provide free access to Lynda.com for six months, and then the Strategic Technology Forum will evaluate the program’s effectiveness and popularity with the campus community to see if it will be continued.The website can be accessed at any time, and students or faculty need only to log in at http://www.usc.edu/its/lynda by using their USC e-mail account.last_img read more

Dodgers’ final NLDS roster decisions depend on size of their bullpen

first_img Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start “It’s not pins and needles,” Verdugo said. “If I’m on the roster, I’m on the roster. If not, probably go to Arizona and stay hot just in case I have to come back up. For me, it’s just handle what I can control day by day.”The lockers of pitchers Yimi Garcia, Tony Cingrani and Pat Venditte were empty Wednesday, or nearly so. They were not on the field for the Dodgers’ afternoon workout. Neither was right-hander John Axford. Rosscup was on the field for his final full-squad practice. So was right-hander J.T. Chargois, who made only one appearance in September after recovering from a nerve issue in his neck.If those six pitchers do not make the postseason roster, that leaves 10 men fighting for six or seven spots behind Jansen: Maeda, Madson, Ferguson, Wood, Stripling, Urías, Pedro Baez, Josh Fields, Scott Alexander and Dylan Floro.Floro has only made one appearance since Sept. 21 but said his health is not an issue.“I’m ready to go,” he said.“We’ve kind of dug into potential matchups and what plays for our guys and what are favorable matchups. … There’s a lot of difficult decisions. That’s what’s kind of taking so long,” Roberts said.Related Articles Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error PreviousLos Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts watches his players during baseball practice Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, in Los Angeles for Thursday’s Game 1 of the team’s National League Division Series against the Atlanta Braves. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Rich Hill of the Los Angeles Dodgers plays around with his son Brice prior to workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Rich Hill of the Los Angeles Dodgers plays around with his son Brice prior to workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsA quiet Dodger stadium before the workout prior to game one of National League Division Series between the Atlanta Braves and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Brice Hill son of the Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher Rich Hill chases a baseball during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Hyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers speaks top the media during a press conference during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Clayton Kershaw, right, with Rich Hill, left, of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Kenta Maeda #18 of the Los Angeles Dodgers speaks to the media during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Andrew Friedman is the President of Baseball Operations of the Los Angeles Dodgers, left, as Yasmani Grandal #9 of the Los Angeles Dodgers walks past during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Dave Roberts #30 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Rich Hill of the Los Angeles Dodgers plays around with his son Brice prior to workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Rick Honeycutt #40 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Clayton Kershaw #22 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Andrew Friedman is the President of Baseball Operations of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Joc Pederson #31 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Yasiel Puig #66 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Chase Utley of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Manny Machado, left, along with teammates Matt Kemp and Justin Turner during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Enrique Hernandez #14 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, left, with Enrique Hernandez during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Manny Machado, left, along with teammates Matt Kemp and Yasiel Puig during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, left, with Max Muncy during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts, right, with Enrique Hernandez during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Freddie Freeman #5 of the Atlanta Braves during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Atlanta Braves coach Ron Washington, right, works with Charlie Culberson during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Atlanta Braves Eric Young with his son Dallas Young as teammate Ozzie Albies #1 takers a picture during a workout prior to game one of National League Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Atlanta Braves warm up during baseball practice Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, in Los Angeles for Thursday’s Game 1 of the team’s National League Division Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Kenley Jansen throws a ball during practice Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, in Los Angeles, ahead of Thursday’s Game 1 of the team’s National League Division Series against the Atlanta Braves. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Los Angeles Dodgers manager Dave Roberts watches his players during baseball practice Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, in Los Angeles for Thursday’s Game 1 of the team’s National League Division Series against the Atlanta Braves. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)Rich Hill of the Los Angeles Dodgers plays around with his son Brice prior to workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 38Rich Hill of the Los Angeles Dodgers plays around with his son Brice prior to workout prior to game one of National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)ExpandLOS ANGELES — For the Dodgers players who knew Wednesday they weren’t making the postseason roster, the day before the National League Division Series was easy. Pitcher Zac Rosscup said the fateful conversation was short.“They just kind of told me to stay ready,” said Rosscup, who will head to Arizona with the other pitchers on the Dodgers’ taxi squad.Ryan Madson said he woke up at 7 a.m. on Wednesday.“Today just dragged, waiting to hear,” he said. “The time of my career – it’s like, eh, there’s a lot of question marks. In 2015 spring training, when I was trying to come back (from injuries) and I didn’t know literally the next day was in store, it kind of reminds me of that time. Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco “That was January, February, March. At least this is just one day.”Madson, a 38-year-old right-hander, was singing the blues of a man on the bubble. The Dodgers’ roster for the best-of-five series against the Atlanta Braves will feature seven or eight relief pitchers, Manager Dave Roberts said. This was the last hurdle to clear before finalizing the 25-man roster, which can be changed after each playoff round.The deadline for the Braves and Dodgers to submit their rosters to Major League Baseball is 10 a.m. PT on Thursday. The first pitch of Game 1 is scheduled for 5:37 p.m.An eight-man bullpen is typical for a five-game series, but the Dodgers’ relief core is not typical. Behind closer Kenley Jansen, Roberts can use several pitchers who began the year as starters: Kenta Maeda, Alex Wood, Caleb Ferguson, Ross Stripling and perhaps Julio Urías, who did not begin pitching minor league rehabilitation games until July 30.In theory, those six would allow the Dodgers to carry a seven-man bullpen with an extra position player on their bench. Rookie outfielder Alex Verdugo sounded like a man on the bubble Wednesday afternoon. He said he wasn’t sure whether or not he would be on the 25-man roster.last_img read more

Wriddhiman Saha registers himself in the history books with his 100th Test dismissal

first_imgAdvertisement oksd6NBA Finals | Brooklyn Vs8hgpgWingsuit rodeo📽Sindre Ecn6gb( IG: @_aubreyfisher @imraino ) mhrWould you ever consider trying this?😱tj4jCan your students do this? 🌚9dh4Roller skating! Powered by Firework Apart from their strong batting line-up and a fiery pace attack, the Indian cricket team under Virat Kohli have made significant improvement in fielding. Over the last few years the team have made spectacular fielding a habit which was evident in the first day of the historic Day-Night Test at Kolkata. Rohit Sharma took a one-handed flyer and just a while later, keeper Wriddhiman Saha pulled off a stunning low catch to remove Mahmudullah in a move that no one in the stadium saw coming.Advertisement The Eden Gardens crowd thought they saw the catch of the match by opener Rohit Sharma when the wicketkeeper decided to raise the bar.Advertisement The 20th over was being bowled by Ishant Sharma and Mahmudullah edged the fourth ball of the over towards skipper Virat Kohli. Saha sensing that it won’t carry till his captain at first slip, dived to his right and the ball stuck right in the webbing between the thumb and forefinger.With this stunner, Saha also completed 100 dismissals in Test cricket and is the fifth Indian to reach the landmark. MS Dhoni, leads the chart with 294 dismissals in 166 innings while Syed Kirmani is second with 198 dismissals from 151 innings. Kiran More (130) and Nayan Mongia (107) are on the third and fourth spots respectively.Read Also:Virat Kohli: Pink ball favours swing bowlingFormer captain Mohammad Azharuddin explains why Indian bowling attack is lethalVirat Kohli ready to play pink ball cricket in Australia – provided there is a practice match beforehand! Advertisementlast_img read more

SHOEMAKER MILE STAKES QUOTES

first_imgKOSTA HRONIS, PART OWNER, TALCO: “When we saw the early fractions we felt pretty good, and we’re happy that this win pays his fee for the Breeders’ Cup (Mile at Keeneland on Oct. 31). He was first or second in his last four races and he got the pace today.” TYLER BAZE, MIDNIGHT STORM, SECOND: “He didn’t handle that grass at all, he couldn’t really get a hold of it. I’m still very proud of the way he ran; he never threw in the towel.” TRAINER QUOTES JOCKEY QUOTES JOSE LEZCANO, SEEK AGAIN, THIRD: “My horse just didn’t do it today. I tried to keep up with Talco and couldn’t.”             NOTES: Under the enhancements of the Challenge series, Breeders’ Cup Limited will pay the $40,000 entry fee of the Shoemaker Mile winner to start in the Mile if that horse is nominated to the Breeders’ Cup program by Oct. 19, the Pre-Entry deadline. Breeders’ Cup is providing all North American connections of horses based outside of Kentucky a $10,000 travel allowance to start in the Championships. Winning owners Hronis Racing LLC are from Delano, CA.center_img LARRY BENAVIDEZ, ASSISTANT TO JOHN SADLER, TALCO, WINNER: “After the first quarter mile, we were smiling, especially since the grass looked a little longer than normal. It was a big win. We just kind of wanted them to go fast up front, and we figured the one (Winning Prize) was going to go, with the blinkers on. Finally the race played out like it looked on paper and this horse is in top form right now.” RAFAEL BEJARANO, TALCO, WINNER: “When I came to the stretch, I knew Tyler (Baze, on Midnight Storm) still had a lot of horse. My horse gave me such a big kick off the turn, we were able to challenge him right away and then we outran him to the finish. The whole key to winning today was being able to stay inside around the far turn and really kicking well.“The turf is really soft and deep. I let him break good and I didn’t want him too far back. I saw that the pace was a little slow, for this kind of race, for these horses, so I didn’t want to be too far off the pace.” -30- FLAVIEN PRAT, BAL A BALI, FIFTH: “I had a good trip . . . I was pretty good on the last turn and I asked him and he didn’t answer . . . We beat the winner the last time so I don’t know; he was not good today.”last_img read more

San Dimas, Bonita rivalry won’t go away

first_imgSAN DIMAS – Bill Zernickow lives in Claremont but does some of his shopping at the Target store in La Verne. Why not? It’s the closest one to his home. Zernickow can walk through the aisles of the La Verne Target with no problem 51 weeks out of the year. But not this week. This is the week where everything changes. And there is much more at stake than Zernickow’s shopping habits. Tonight, the Zernickow-coached San Dimas Saints and their rivals, the Bonita Bearcats, will meet in the annual Smudge Pot game for the 34th time. It is an intradistrict battle between the neighboring cities of San Dimas and La Verne, two places that have somehow retained the apple-pie feel of small-town America while a metropolis grew around them. “We were always the same way.” San Dimas is hoping to repeat the ’93 scenario. The Saints have struggled with an 0-4 start while Bonita is 4-0. At Bonita, where the Smudge Pot has resided eight of the last nine years, students spent the week throwing anti-Saints rallies and decorated the school’s classroom windows with signs and pro-Bearcat slogans. San Dimas celebrated by having an anti-green day Wednesday (no students were allowed to wear Bonita’s colors) and a blue-and-gold day Thursday (no students were allowed to wear anything but San Dimas colors). “It doesn’t matter if part of your family went to San Dimas and part went to Bonita,” said former Bearcat David Musa, who helps coach his ex-team. “There’s still hatred there.” Said Zernickow: “These players grew up as little boys, dreaming about playing in the Smudge Pot game, under the lights, with 10,000 people in the stands. The Smudge Pot means everything.” That is why Zernickow isn’t welcome at his favorite Target store this week. And why he has been getting calls all week – some from complete strangers – asking him to beat Bonita and bring back the Smudge Pot. That’s a familiar story to Zernickow’s mentor, Bonita coach Eric Podley. Zernickow was Podley’s defensive coordinator at Northview from 1997-98, and the first-year San Dimas coach said Podley is “my father in coaching.” The two have remained close friends and even had an hour-long phone conversation Tuesday, adding more spice to tonight’s game – not that any was needed. After all, Podley said, the matchup might not ever lose its intensity. “Both cities have limited growth potential,” he said, “so it’s less likely they’ll add another high school and dilute the rivalry. “It’ll be these same two high schools for the next 30 years, just like it’s been for the last 30 years.” The Smudge Pot figures to stand the test of time as well. It is a silver relic from the era where the pots were used to heat citrus orchards to ward off frost. The Bonita-San Dimas version has the score of every game etched on a plaque and bolted to the pot’s base. Bonita linebacker Pablo Garay often goes out of his way to walk by the Smudge Pot in its custom-built trophy case. “I think, `That’s ours. It’s staying here,’ ” he said. Naturally, players like the Saints’ Chad Massey and Eric Samples beg to differ. “We’ve been trying to please other people in the last four games,” Samples said. “We’re going to do it for family, do it for each other.” Said Massey: “Everyone’s been doubting us because of the season we’ve had so far … it would really mean a lot (to win).” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 Bonita alum Glenn Davis gave the school a Heisman Trophy from his award-winning 1946 season. But which Bonita trophy has the most prestigious placement, sitting in the central office for all to see? It’s not the Heisman. It’s the Smudge Pot. Winning the Smudge Pot, which stays at the victorious school for a year, can be a season-making event that stays with players and coaches for generations. To wit: In 1993, San Dimas entered Smudge Pot week 0-9. But the team upset Bonita 19-0 and brought home the trophy, so everyone deemed it a successful season. “As a coach, you try to fight it,” said San Dimas assistant coach Mark Stevenson, a senior on that ’93 squad. “But these players are so much more worried about beating Bonita than they are about winning the league and going on in the playoffs. last_img

Tactics and tales from the raccoon-trapping frontier

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The raccoon is hard to love, but easy to respect. The coon commits a variety of social infractions that make it a real pest in agricultural areas — crop damage, stealing chickens and eggs, raiding gardens, and making smelly messes of barns and hay mows. Coons are curious critters, and this curiosity often lands this brazen omnivore — who will eat almost anything — in trouble. As naturalist Marty Stouffer has observed, this “masked bandit knows what he’s after and is bold enough to risk the consequences.”Outdoorsman and trapper Ryan Minyo, of Morrow County, agrees.“They’re curious animals. They aren’t afraid to try something new. Raccoons just go for it. But they’re not doing things to be hateful. A raccoon does what it does to feed itself and its family,” Minyo said. “They do what they have to do to survive; they are just going about their lives like we are.”Minyo, a senior at Highland High School, took up serious trapping as a freshman (after being taught to trap as a youngster by his father, Dale) in order to fulfill the requirements for his state FFA degree.“I need to make $3,000 profit from my SAE project as part of my FFA State Degree. To do this, I sell firewood and the pelts from coon, muskrat, and mink that I trap,” he said, “I wanted to help local farmers and landowners and at the same time make some money on the side. After a few years of trapping, farmers now call me to take care of problem animals.”When trapping for coons, Ryan has learned that “no one place is the same — you need to know all the different techniques and strategies to catch coons in different habitats, environments, and setups. I have also learned about the time and money investments required to be an effective trapper through my project. I have $1,800 dollars in traps and supplies and have had to learn how to best market the furs. There is also a lot of time spent checking trap lines every day and preparing the pelts after the animals are harvested.”When trapping coons, Ryan prefers dog-proof traps.“They allow me to trap near barns and outbuildings without catching unwanted animals. I also use live traps in barns,” Ryan said. “I will use leg hold traps when running creek lines and farm fields. For bait, I use dog food and maple syrup, and when the raccoon rut is on in January, I will also put gland lure about four to five feet in the air above the traps to bring the coons in. At that point in the year, the coon’s main instinct is breeding, and the gland lure attracts the boar coon because it feels that another coon has invaded its territory, which makes him curious and brings him in to the trap to check things out. Coons are everywhere. It’s a species that is easily targeted.”Trapping the raccoon is just the first step.“There’s work that goes into processing hides, but the raccoon’s hide is easy to prepare and it doesn’t take too much time, not like a huge coyote,” he said. “It takes me 5 minutes to skin, 15 minutes to scrape and put on a board, and a week to cure the coon pelt.”Most importantly, Ryan said that regardless of his respect for this animal, his interest in trapping raccoons is based on the need to maintain a balance in agricultural ecosystems.“Whether we think about it or not and regardless if the fur market is up or down, raccoons need to be managed. I’ve seen 40 to 50 acres of corn that have been destroyed mainly by coons,” he said.Ryan has become quite adept at managing raccoon populations in his neck of the woods.“At one spot near my house — a creek running through a cattle pasture on one of my teacher’s properties — I caught a new raccoon in the same trap along the creek every day for two weeks straight,” he said. “I have been running a trap line for four years, since I was a freshman. My first year, a buddy and I caught 30 raccoons. We thought that was amazing, but every year the numbers have steadily gone up. I’ve trapped 120 coons this year, and I pulled my traps at the start of deer gun season the first week of December. I put them back out in the first week or so of January.”While the raccoon has been relegated to nuisance status in many farmers’ minds, it should be noted that the critter possesses qualities of a more regal and revered beast of the forest. Raccoons have been compared to bears in several cultures. The German name for the raccoon, “waschbar,” translates as “little bear” and the Mexican name for the coon, “osito lavador,” means “little bear washer,” a reference to the raccoon’s habit of “washing” its food in water prior to consumption. And indeed, raccoons and bears share many qualities. The coon’s track looks like a miniature version of the bear’s and they have similar diets and habits. Both are known for their inquisitive, scavenging nature. They claw up rotting wood for grubs, are attracted to berry patches, and are driven to put on a layer of fat in late summer/early fall for winter, gaining 25% of their original body weight during this time. Like bears, ring-tails walk flat-footed, with a high-humped back and a shuffling, lazy walk; when on the run, both animals possess a rocking gait.Ryan Minyo and other raccoon trappers are participating in a tradition, pursuit, and livelihood that stretch back centuries on this continent, and raccoons have played an important role in the history and development of the nation. They were a common and important source of food and income for Native Americans and early European settlers and explorers. Raccoon was a staple food item for Christopher Columbus’ sailors. According to zoologist Samuel I. Zeveloff in his book Raccoons: A Natural History, early settlers “presumably roasted raccoon and strips of their meat were smoked like bacon. Their fat was used for many purposes: it could be applied as a salve for bruises and sprains, it was converted into a lubricant and employed as a leather softener, and it was probably used in place of lard.”Examples abound of how early Americans took advantage of the raccoon as a resource. Native American tribes used the animal’s s-shaped penis bone as a pipe-cleaning tool. In the cold winters during the Revolutionary War, American soldiers donned coonskin caps for warmth, and there was such a great European demand for raccoon pelts during the frontier era that coonskins could be substituted for money to pay court fees and to purchase goods at trading posts.Highland senior Ryan Minyo has taken up trapping for his FFA SAE. Here he is holding the first coyote he trapped.Ryan Minyo clearly understands this frontier impulse to use the resources that avail themselves to an outdoorsman, as he noted that through his trapping experiences, he has learned “how nature works, and to take what you can catch, and make the most out of what you can get.”The raccoon’s common name derives from the Algonquin Indian name for the animal, “arakunem,” which roughly means “he who scratches with hands.” Minyo points out that a raccoon’s paws are 30 times more sensitive than human hands. Lake Erie and the Erie tribal group take their names from the Huron tribe’s name for the raccoon, “iri,” or “eri,” meaning “big-tailed.”This moniker for the lake and people has its roots in the frontier fur trade, as Zeveloff explains: “A Northern Huron tribe may have been the first to use the term ‘big-tailed’ for both the pelts and the tribes bearing them, and the other local tribes evidently adopted this label. These southern fur traders hence became known as ‘people of the long-tailed ones’ and the nearby lake was called ‘lake of the long-tailed ones’…This is why the southernmost Great Lake is named Erie, as was the tribe of fur traders from its southern shore.” Although many a curious coon finds itself the victim of a trapper’s tricks each trapping season, there are always more of these resilient animals to fill the void left by their fallen brethren. Say what one will about these sneaky little thieves, they are clever, tough, and intelligent, as testified to by a variety of American naturalists who have observed many admirable qualities in the species.In his book Wild Animal Ways, Ernest Thompson Seton speaks reverently of the creature’s stealthy ghostliness, calling the raccoon “the black-masked wanderer of the night and of the tall timber…the dryad of the hollow trees.”In his field identification guide, The Complete Tracker, Len McDougal points out that raccoons are “exceptionally tough and ferocious fighters when injured or cornered. I’ve seen them whip game dogs twice their size, even luring hounds into deep water where the coon actively tried to drown them.”Calling it a “ring-tailed rascal,” Marty Stouffer also admires the raccoon’s hardiness and “street smarts,” pointing out that one “measure of intelligence is adaptability.” The coon is found in all of the lower 48 United States, southern Canada, and down into Central America, inhabiting every ecosystem from un-peopled woodlands to urban cityscapes.Although the chances for frontier freedom and the lust for raccoon pelts has declined in contemporary times, as the previous quotes show, there is still much to be appreciated and learned from the raccoon’s habits and lifestyle, and much to be gained from a person’s chase of these wily varmints.Ryan Minyo clearly understands this, saying that the most enjoyable aspect of running trap lines for coons is “being able to get away from society, to go into the woods and run traps, where it’s peaceful and quiet, and there are no phones or demands of you, and there is no one to tell you that you have to do this, or do that. You’re out there doing your own thing and seeing how animals interact, how they live, and learning about how people used to live before us.”last_img read more

US Department of Defense Embraces Open Source

first_imgAt the US Department of Defense, open source and proprietary software are now on equal footing. According to Defense Department guidance issued yesterday (PDF), open-source software (OSS) should be treated just like any other software product. The document also specifies some of the advantages of OSS for the Department of Defense (DoD). These include the ability to quickly alter the code as situations and missions change, the stability of the software because of the broad peer-review, as well as the absence of per-seat licensing costs.The document also stresses that OSS is “particularly suitable for rapid prototyping and experimentation, where the ability to ‘test drive’ the software with minimal costs and administrative delays can be important.”Clarifying OSS MisconceptionsThe DoD already uses some open-source products. This new memorandum is meant to provide guidance on the use of OSS and to clarify some misconceptions. According to the DoD, these misconceptions have hampered “effective DoD use and development of OSS.”One of these misconceptions is that the DoD would have to distribute any changes made to the OSS code. In reality, most open-source licenses permit users to modify code for internal use and these organizations only have to make the changes public if they distribute the code outside of their organizations. It’s good to see the government embrace open-source software – though some members of the open-source movement will feel a bit queasy about the DoD using their software. Just last week, the White House website became a Drupal site and hopefully other branches of government will follow the DoD’s lead and embrace open source as a valid means of acquiring and developing software.DOD Open Source Rules 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#news#web frederic lardinoislast_img read more

An Open Letter from TFA CEO; NRL-TFA Strategic Alliance

first_imgTuesday, August 20, 2013On behalf of Touch Football Australia (TFA) please refer to the below/attached Open Letter to TFA Members by Colm Maguire, CEO TFA,  in relation to the recently announced strategic alliance between NRL and TFA.Related News:An Historic Day for Touch FootballTFA – NRL Partnership – CEO Member Letter An Open Letter from TFA CEO; NRL-TFA Strategic Alliancelast_img