BNest creates social impact with Limerick entrepreneurs

first_imgEmail Kasia Zabinska and BNest, Eamon Ryan, BNest Founder (centre back) with some of the participants from the 2017-18 BNest social enterprise incubator. Picture: Cian ReinhardtBNest, the first dedicated Social Enterprise Incubator Programme in Ireland held a free Ask&Advise evening at the Bank of Ireland Workbench space, O’Connell Street Limerick.The Ask&Advise evening allowed organisations with an aim of making a positive social impact to share advice, tips, and useful contacts with organisations and people making a social impact in our communities.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Eamon Ryan, founder of BNest said, “Our idea was simple – gather together in one room those who work on making a positive social impact and anyone willing to help them and give them advice.“Events like Ask&Advise shows the power of people’s minds when they let themselves loose and share problems with other like-minded people. There is nothing more powerful.”Chris MM Gordon, Founder of the Irish Social Enterprise Network and Managing Partner of Collaboration Ireland was the host of the evening.Mr Gordon said the evening is beneficial for social enterprises who often find themselves “caught between two stools,” as they are trying to make profits selling products and services but are also trying to achieve the social aspect.BNest is an initiative created specifically to help social entrepreneurs nurture their start-ups, it aims to bridge the gap between achieving social impact and running a business, while also supporting its participants on their personal journeys.Applications for the 2018/2019 BNest annual six-month programme will open July 1, 2018. The programme teaches emerging social entrepreneurs how to get their new organisations off to the best start by focusing on key areas related to developing their enterprises, in terms of business, social and personal aspects. Previous articleWin cinema ticketsNext articleEVA tour and talk Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] Kasia Zabinska of BNest says, “We want BNest to be the go-to place for social impact businesses and Ask&Advise events help to increase connectively amongst them and anyone willing to help, because together we can achieve so much more!” adding, “What we’re doing here, is bringing people closer together. Every question asked received great, outside-of-the-box, practical suggestions, and so many useful contacts were shared.”While a third AskAdvise evening is being planned for the second half of the year, BNest encourages everyone interested in this space to attend their event, ‘Social Entrepreneurship – A Path For Me?” which will take place on Saturday, June 9 from 10am to 3pm at the Nexus Innovation Centre at University of Limerick. The event is a half-day interactive and practical workshop to give you insights into the reality of social impact business. It will let you explore the social enterprise space using actual stories of local businesses, non-profits, and community enterprises and help to understand a little more of the possibilities it might offer you. While the workshop is free, they are asking all participants to contribute €25 towards a local charity, Milford Hospice. For more info contact [email protected] the Limerick Post Business section for similar stories. WhatsApp Facebook Advertisement Ann & Steve Talk Stuff | Episode 29 | Levelling Up NewsBusinessBNest creates social impact with Limerick entrepreneursBy Cian Reinhardt – May 11, 2018 2139 Exercise With Oxygen Training at Ultimate Health Clinic Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Linkedin TAGSBank of IrelandBNestbusinessCommunitysocialWorkbench Limerick businesses urged to accept Irish Business Design Challenge Print TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! last_img read more

Panel analyzes India’s elections

first_imgTags: bharativya janata party, BJP, CWIL, hinduism, India, india elections 2014, karie cross, panel at saint mary’s on india, pradeep naravanan, sonalini sapra, srishti agnihotri On Wednesday, Saint Mary’s hosted a panel on the 2014 elections in India as part of International Education Week, sponsored by the Center for Women’s Intercultural Leadership (CWIL) and the department of political science. The panel was called “India 2014: Assessing the Elections and Beyond.”Contributing to the panel were four presenters, including Srishti Agnihotri, a graduate student in International Human Rights Law at Notre Dame, Sonalini Sapra, assistant professor in political science at Saint Mary’s, Karie Cross, a Ph.D student in political science and peace studies at Notre Dame and Pradeep Narayanan, head of research and consultancies at Praxis Institute for Participatory Practices in India. Chair of political science at Saint Mary’s Marc Belanger helped to facilitate the discussion.Agnihotri began the panel discussion as the first presenter, focusing on the context surrounding India’s 2014 elections. She spoke of India as a multi-party parliamentary system, with 543 available seats in the congress. The significance of this election was due to the fact that the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) won the majority, holding 282 seats, which has not happened since 1984, Agnihotri said.The reason the BJP was able to get so many seats was due to “changes that arose between the 2009 election and the 2014 election that diminished public opinion of the government,” which “was due to a series of a high-profile scandals,” she said.“The public began to see the regime as corrupt, and what could have been defended by public policy, the government seemed to be completely mute,” Agnihotri said.Agnihotri also brought up the reasons the leader of the BJP, Shri Atal Bihari Vajpayeeas, was able to gain popularity.“He was a self-made man, who had very good public speaking skills … but under his leadership, the BJP was able to channel the sense of dissatisfaction, due to corruption, inflation and the increase of rapings, into political action,” she said.The second panelist presenter, Cross, changed the tone of the panel to focus on religion in India’s election, describing the significance of Hindu nationalism and how it had been utilized by politics in the past.Cross discussed how there were two ideas about running the government in regards to Hindu nationalism.“Hinduism is not just a religion, but it gives India its distinctive national identity … and that others do not have to convert but adapt and accept the sameness of the nation’s interest,” Cross said. “This was against the idea that all religions should have an equal pull in the state and focus on diversity and inclusion.“There would be a problem because the minorities could lose their security to practice their own cultures” Cross said. “Incidents of religious tensions and riots in Gujarat that were possibly led by the new PM, Modi, reveal this loss of security. This was overshadowed by Modi’s focus on economic growth, which was largely accepted, and shows that the economy is being more valued than humanity.”Cross also looked to different areas in India, such as the northeast, where there is an even larger diversity.“Problems of sameness promoted by Hindu Nationalism reveals that the conditions of people in the northeast will degenerate,” she said.Narayanan, who joined the discussion via Skype, spoke of the different influences effecting participation and voters in the 2014 Indian election.“What is shaping elections today is a bit of danger, which comes from the Americanization of the Indian election … the rise of the power of money and how it is able to influence how politics are brought out into the public domain and change the narration of debates,” Narayanan said. “My main point is that in 2009, the government was not voted out by the people, because big corporate lobbies were in favor of the government.”According to Narayanan, corruption within the system stems from inequity, which is the main problem.“Because corruption is being addressed without looking at equity technical solutions being made cannot fix the situation,” he said.The final presenter, Sapra, described the environmental policies in the post-election period.“I want to emphasize that it is not just the modern government that has not taken environmental policy seriously, but previous governments as well did not fulfill any of their promises of environment sustainability,” Sapra said.Sapra spoke of how the government’s focus on economic development overshadowed the environmental concerns.“Businesses would more often support the focus of economic interest, but many critics would stress that it is hard to separate the environmental concerns from the needs of the Indian people,” she said. “Coal mining is increasing in India, which is affecting more people because it is by the process of strip mining.“India has long maintained that it has not been largely responsible for emissions thus far and so should be able to industrialize,” she said.However, Sapra spoke of positive initiatives to clean up India that can act as generative solutions to the environmental concerns.“By 2019, the holy city of Varanasi is to be cleaned … it is interesting how initiatives are being taken up by local communities and religion,” she said.last_img read more